Defence Economics & Industry
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  • About Centre

    India spends a significant amount of resources on its national defence. Efficiency in utilisation of resources is not only an economic imperative but vital for defence preparedness. In view of this, the Defence Economics and Industry Centre was created in 2006 to promote research on various economic aspects of India's defence. Since its inception, the Centre has undertaken a number of policy relevant studies besides constantly engaging vital stakeholders (Ministry of Defence, Armed Forces and Industry) on a range of issues. The major focus areas of the Centre are:

    • Defence Acquisition
      • Organisational and procedural improvement
      • Offsets
    • Defence Industry
      • Self-reliance in Defence Production
      • Efficiency of Defence Public Sector Undertakings/Ordnance Factory Board
      • Enhancing Private Sector Participation in Defence Production
    • Defence Research and Development
    • Defence Budget

    Members

    Best Practices in Financial Management: Accrual Accounting for Defence

    Changes in public financial management across the globe have necessitated India to revisit its traditional methods of managing and depicting its public finances. One of the major changes envisaged is a quest to migrate gradually to accrual accounting from the traditional cash-based accounting.

    2019

    Transfer of Defence Technology: Understanding the Nuances and Making it Work for India

    • Publisher: KW Publishers
      2019
    In recent years, transfer of defence technology to India, as an alternate route to indigenous development, has been frequently brought up with widely varying views from the Indian defence technology fraternity. Some lament its failure to help India achieve self-reliance, while others suggest it can enable India to leapfrog ahead. While it has been paradoxically found to be more expensive than outright purchase of defence systems, there are indications that countries such as Israel, South Korea and China have gained immensely from it. While there has been a flood of ToT proposals from foreign OEMs after the launch of the Make in India initiative, there have been few proposals which have materialised and a miniscule number successfully implemented. Acknowledging the need to unravel these mysteries, this book attempts to throw light on the entire range of connected aspects from a brief historical perspective to an understanding of its fundamentals and nuances, to how ToT should be aligned with national goals and there on to its implementation issues. Initially addressing the conventional mode and its complexities, it expands to touch upon the others, then the unconventional ones, the facilitators such as offsets and the transaction in its widest sense. Thus enveloping the complete spectrum, it brings its insights together to converge on a possibly successful arrangement for India. Written in an explorative, questioning style, this book will intrigue interested readers and propel the Indian defence technology community to dwell on its findings and suggestions for the formulation of a cogent way forward.
    • ISBN: 978-93-89137-17-0,
    • Price: ₹.980/-
    • E-copy available
    2019

    Indian Defence Industry: An Agenda for Making in India

    Indian Defence Industry: An Agenda for Making in India
    • Publisher: Pentagon Press

    This book thoroughly probes the Indian Defence industry and the policies pertaining to it. Based on hard core evidence, it identifies the key shortcomings of this vital sector and provides a detailed roadmap for the Modi government’s ambitious ‘Make in India’ programme to succeed in defence production sector. Though written with a clear focus on influencing policy making, the book is presented in an accessible format to be easily understood by the wider strategic community.

    • ISBN 978-81-8274-905-4,
    • Price: ₹. 995
    • E-copy available
    2016

    Indigenisation: Key to Self-Sufficiency and Strategic Capability

    Indigenisation: Key to Self-Sufficiency and Strategic Capability
    • Publisher: Pentagon Press

    The book attempts to study the defence industrialisation process that has been adopted by the militarily developed and developing nations to analyse, orient and adapt their best practices to the Indian defence industry and technological base. The analysis reveals that there is a requirement to re-assess, re-align & re-model the Indian defence industry apparatus in line with the vision of accelerating indigenisation, self-sufficiency and strategic capability, as pertaining to military systems.

    • ISBN 978-81-8274-892-7,
    • Price: ₹. 1295
    • E-copy available
    2016

    Defence Offsets: International Best Practices and Lessons for India

    Defence Offsets: International Best Practices and Lessons for India

    The Monograph provides a comprehensive roadmap for reforming India’s defence offset policy which despite having gone through several rounds of revisions in past decade or so, still lacks effectiveness. The roadmap is based on extensive study of offset practices followed by six countries: Canada, Israel, Malaysia, South Korea, Turkey and the UAE.

    2015

    India–US Defence Cooperation: Assessing Strategic Imperatives

    Over the last decade or so, especially during much of Barack Obama’s presidential tenure, the defence sector has become the focus area of cooperation between India and the US. India’s engagement with the US in the area of defence is riding on a new-found realism that drives both countries’ strategic aspirations.

    January 2018

    Defence Offsets: A System-Level View

    How effective are offsets as a means to boost a domestic defence industry? This article takes a novel approach to answering this question; examining global data on levels of defence sales over three decades as a measure of successful defence industrialisation (i.e., using the market as an indicator of success). The quantitative data points to a mixed picture as despite the ubiquity of defence offsets, they are no guarantees of success in defence industrialisation.

    July 2013

    A Perspective on Defence Planning in India

    The available literature on defence planning in India does not make for very encouraging reading. A few things stand out. Firstly, there is an acute dearth, if not almost complete absence, of authentic official accounts and analysis of what has gone on in the name of defence planning over the last six decades. Secondly, narratives based either on personal recollection or on opinions and views of those who have directly or indirectly been associated with defence planning at different points of time have filled this void. Others have chipped in too.

    July 2012

    India's Defence Offset Policy

    Although India has established a formal mechanism for implementation of the defence offset policy, the structure and procedures lack the thrust to fulfil the objective of energizing the Indian defence industry. Besides, the policy is not supported by the existing Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and licensing policies. While evidence suggests that domestic industry can absorb offsets, what India needs is an effective body to handle offsets, liberal FDI and licensing policies, and a better banking provision.

    March 2009

    Iran’s Nuclear Quandary

    The European Union-3 and Iran are indeed up against formidable odds to keep the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) alive going forward.

    February 21, 2020

    Defence Budget 2020-21

    The slowdown in economic growth not only seems to have cast its shadow on the allocation of the defence budget for 2020-21 but has also compounded the challenges for the country’s first CDS.

    February 12, 2020

    India’s Defence Budget 2020-21

    Considering that the defence capital expenditure already accounts for a very high share in the central government’s overall capital spend, any substantial hike in the former’s share looks less likely. This is more so given the government’s priority to spend on infrastructure and other non-defence capital assets to revive the economic growth.

    February 04, 2020

    Protocol for Contract Administration and Post-Contract Management

    There is a need to evolve a protocol for contract administration and post-contract management of all capital and revenue contracts awarded by various departments of the defence ministry and the armed forces.

    November 25, 2019

    Defining the Charter of Chief of Defence Staff

    Having decided to create the post of CDS, the next logical step for the government is to define its charter of duties and responsibilities. The government needs to examine not just the CDS’s role as a single-point military advisor, but also his role in other matters that are equally important in driving critical defence reforms.

    November 21, 2019

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