East Asia
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  • About Centre

    The East Asia Centre is dedicated to study and research the domestic and foreign policies of individual countries of the region as well as India’s multifaceted relationships with these countries. With respect to China, the Centre’s research foci are its foreign policy (particularly towards the US, Russia, Central Asia and Asia Pacific), domestic politics, economy, the People’s Liberation Army (PLA), Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) and India’s relationship with China in all its dimensions. The Centre’s research also focuses on Taiwan, its domestic politics, Sino-Taiwanese relationship and Indo-Taiwanese relationship, Hong Kong and India-Hong Kong relations. Japan and Korea are the other major focus of the Centre, with its research focused on their domestic politics, foreign policy and comprehensive bilateral relationships with India. The geopolitics of the Asia Pacific and the Korean peninsula are also studied in the Centre. The Centre brings out the bimonthly newsletter - East Asia Monitor - on China, Japan and the Korean Peninsula.

    The Centre brings out bimonthly newsletter - East Asia Monitor - on China, Japan and the Korean Peninsula.

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    India-China Relations: Politics of Resources, Identity and Authority in a Multipolar World Order

    • Publisher: Routledge
      2017

    The rise of India and China as two major economic and political actors in both regional and global politics necessitates an analysis of not only their bilateral ties but also the significance of their regional and global pursuits. This book looks at the nuances and politics that the two countries attach to multilateral institutions and examines how they receive, react to and approach each other’s presence and upsurge.

    • ISBN 978-11-3883-359-3
    • Price: £90.00
    • E-copy available
    2017

    Events leading to the Sino-Indian Conflict of 1962

    This monograph presents an objective account of a very crucial six-year period (1956-1962) in the histories of India and China (and Tibet) -- the countries directly involved in the conflict.

    2017

    China Year Book 2015 - China’s Transition under Xi Jinping

    China’s Transition under Xi Jinping
    • Publisher: Pentagon Press

    This volume is an outcome of the annual exercise of the Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses, New Delhi (IDSA) to understand and track China and its developmental course. As a flagship publication of the East Asia Centre in IDSA, the China Year Book (CYB) 2015 is an undertaking to comperehensively analyse China's state transformation internally and externally. To what extent China will smoothly transit to its power quest is still an open query. This volume is an exercise to bring this debate to the fore.

    • ISBN 978-81-8274-907-8,
    • Price: ₹. 1995
    • E-copy available
    2016

    India-Taiwan Relations in Asia and Beyond: The Future

    India-Taiwan Relations in Asia and Beyond: The Future
    • Publisher: Pentagon Press

    This volume is an outcome of the conference that the Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses (IDSA) in collaboration with the Taipei Economic and Cultural Center (TECC) held in New Delhi on 8 December 2015 at IDSA. The conference was organised in New Delhi to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the establishment of their respective Representative Offices in Taipei and New Delhi by India and Taiwan.

    • ISBN 978-81-8274-904-7,
    • Price: ₹. 995
    • E-copy available
    2016

    Changing Contexts of Chinese Military Strategy and Doctrine

    Changing Contexts of Chinese Military Strategy and Doctrine

    This monograph identifies the contexts which have shaped China's military strategy and doctrine. It argues that these have evolved through Party-Military relations as well as through the Chinese leadership's assessment of the international balance of power. In this framework, the monograph has traced the PLA's strategic and doctrinal transformation from a defensive one to one of limited offence, having global aspirations, affecting further changes in China's military strategy and doctrine.

    2016

    Smart diplomacy: exploring China-India synergy, by P.S. Suryanarayana

    In Smart Diplomacy: Exploring China-India Synergy, P.S. Suryanarayana has sought to answer the questions: ‘Will China and India live at peace with each other? Will they be able to overcome the deficit of trust between them? Will they be able to find amicable solutions to their disputes over their borders, Pakistan, Tibet, rivers, and trade, etc.?’ (p. iv). These questions, raised by Ambassador Tommy Koh in his foreword to the book, concern all those who want a stable and productive future for the two countries that Suryanarayana characterizes as the sunrise powers of the 21st century.

    January 2017

    UNSC Resolution 2321 and the DPRK​

    In a strong response to the nuclear warhead test of Pyongyang on September 9, 2016, the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) at its 7821st meeting, held on November 30, 2016, adopted Resolution 2321 (2016)—officially known as S/RES/2321—imposing fresh sanctions on the DPRK (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea). The Resolution specifically imposes restrictions on the DPRK’s exports that assist Pyongyang in generating revenue for its nuclear and ballistic missile programmes.

    March 2017

    China’s Naval Base(s) in the Indian Ocean—Signs of a Maritime Grand Strategy?

    The article assesses China’s Indian Ocean strategy against the backdrop of its naval base development in Djibouti. It argues that China’s naval force posturing stems from a doctrinal shift to ocean-centric strategic thinking and is indicative of the larger gameplan of having a permanent naval presence in the Indian Ocean. China’s maritime strategy comprises four key components. First, to channel naval reinforcements for securing its maritime trade and economic interests in the Indian Ocean Region (IOR)—even as it strengthens the Maritime Silk Road initiative.

    May 2017

    Japan’s Proactive Pacifism: Investing in Multilateralization and Omnidirectional Hedging

    Since 2012, Japan’s foreign policy under Prime Minister (PM) Abe has been characterized as assertive, welcome or provocative. By employing the fear of abandonment/entrapment theory as the analytical framework, this article finds that Japan’s regional foreign policy under Abe is characterized by consolidation and investment in broad-based multilateralism, proactive engagement with partners in the region, including China, and strategic hedging.

    May 2017

    Stress-Test for Chinese Restraint: China Evaluates Russia’s Use of Force

    The article discusses if China will be inspired by its strategic partner Russia to use force as an instrument of its foreign policy. After a pro et con discussion the authors find that the disincentives created by the Russian example are likely to convince China that it should continue to show restraint under the ‘peaceful development’ formula, and avoid military adventures. The East Asian Peace is thus not seriously threatened, at least not by China—for now.

    March 2017

    Panchsheel was noble, but did China embrace it ever?

    Before selectively invoking historical contexts and postulates such as Panchsheel, Chinese officials need to ask themselves “do we have the right to say this.”

    August 18, 2017

    Will North Korea and the United States Go to War?

    Unfortunately, the incoherence in US policy under Trump makes one fear that the probability of a disastrous miscalculation is truly worrisome.

    August 14, 2017

    Doklam, China’s Strategic Calculus and India’s Policy Options

    To effectively cope with the PRC’s hostile attitude, India needs to reduce the power asymmetry, articulate a clear security policy based on a realistic threat assessment, reorganise the military, and revamp the border management mechanism.

    August 11, 2017

    The People’s Liberation Army at Ninety – Poised for a ‘Great Leap’

    The People’s Liberation Army at Ninety

    It will take some time before the PLA can claim to be a modern military, at par with Western armies, capable of undertaking extended global missions. But the PLA is poised for a “Giant Leap”, and that is bound to dramatically change the ‘balance of power’ dynamics.

    August 07, 2017

    The Malabar Exercises: An Appraisal

    India should take the lead in forming an overarching security quad along with Australia, Japan and the US in the Indo-Pacific region.

    July 18, 2017

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