Human Rights

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  • Human Rights in the Indian Armed Forces: An Analysis of Article 33 by U.C. Jha and Sanghamitra Choudhury

    The armed forces are one of the most powerful tools to ensure safety and security of the state from external aggressions. This duty may call upon armed forces personnel to undertake missions with a very high risk to life. To motivate a human being to perform the allocated duty even at the peril of his/her life is an art that armed forces across the globe have mastered. For sustaining such a high level of motivation and to undertake missions in a very organised fashion, military discipline is a key attribute.

    July-September 2020

    Abysmal Human Rights Situation in Balochistan

    The movement of the Baloch people is likely to continue because of the strong undercurrent of popular disaffection in the province against the Pakistan state, and the sustained enthusiasm of the people to fight for their freedom, autonomy and rights

    May 30, 2020

    Ravi Singh asked: What is the concept of ‘Human Security’ and is it different in different regions of the world?

    D.P.K. Pillay replies: ‘Human Security’ as a concept identifies the individual citizen instead of the State as the appropriate referent for security. The idea of ‘human security’ contends that the people of a country that has a well-equipped and strong military are not necessarily “secure” in the true sense. Protecting citizens from attacks from other countries continues to be an important facet in the security calculus, but it should not be the only one.

    Rajesh Gadale asked: Can inclusive cooperation with ardent champions of peace and human rights like the Nordic countries help address India's concern over state-sponsored terrorism?

    Rajeesh Kumar replies: India's concern over state-sponsored terrorism is not linked to the issue of human rights as such. Since India outrightly rejects any third party intervention in its conflict with any state, seeking cooperation or dialogue with or mediation by the Nordic countries is not in order. In case of inter-state disputes impinging on internal security issues that necessitate action by Indian security agencies, there is often the instance of external agencies disturbing peace and security within India.

    China's White Paper on Human Rights: Some Reflections

    The context and timing of this policy document is significant as it surveys the wide spectrum of social issues and the challenges facing China.

    May 28, 2013

    Chen Guangcheng and US-China relations: An Epilogue

    Chen’s departure from the US embassy in Beijing points to the unwillingness and inability of the US to bring to bear any pressure on China on human rights issues.

    May 03, 2012

    Chen Guangcheng and US-China Relations

    The issue of Chen Guangcheng will require much time and many rounds of negotiations so that neither China nor the US “lose face”.

    May 01, 2012

    Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN): Cooperation Problems on Human Rights

    Though the original focus of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) was primarily economic cooperation, the adoption of the ASEAN charter in November 2007 officially included cooperation on human rights. This article examines three hypotheses to determine the causes of cooperation problems: regime type, non-interference policy, and absence of an enforcement mechanism in the ASEAN charter.

    January 2012

    Elevate Human Rights as the Core Organising Principle in Counter Insurgency

    The Indian Army’s Doctrine for Sub Conventional Operations does an admirable job in balancing human rights protection with operational demands. However, there is a degree of dissonance in the approach to human rights brought about by the perspective that protecting human rights is a means to an end.

    November 14, 2011

    Human Trafficking: In Search of a Comprehensive Response Strategy

    A multilateral framework of regional cooperation, human rights based strategy, addressing the root causes and a higher priority for the issue in foreign policy are necessary to comprehensively deal with the challenge of human trafficking.

    August 05, 2011

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