Defence Technology

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  • Mohit Nayak asked: How can indigenisation in the Indian defence sector be enhanced?

    Amit Cowshish replies: As the first step, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) needs to formulate a composite policy that focuses on the indigenisation of high priority technology areas, shedding the notion that it must necessarily result in savings. The commercial viability of the identified projects and institutional arrangement for financing them, apart from a mechanism to accommodate the cost of failed efforts, must form the bedrock of the policy.

    Mohit Kumar Nayak asked: Why does India have a low indigenisation in the defence sector?

    Amit Cowshish replies: Broadly speaking, there are four reasons for the low level of indigenisation in defence products. The primary reason is the absence of a pragmatic overarching policy which, apart from defining the term ‘indigenisation’ which is presently interpreted in different ways, also recognises that indigenisation cannot always result in savings, especially in areas like development of special alloys and critical technologies which do not offer economy of scales.

    Helping Start-ups Cross the ‘Valley of Death’: The Main Challenge for iDEX

    The iDEX has made a commendable effort at putting a defence start-up ecosystem in place. The challenges ahead include maintaining momentum, obtaining funding, and accessing toolsets and data sets.

    December 11, 2020

    Chinmay Khadke asked: Is there any ToT involved in C295 transport aircraft to be built by Tata-Airbus in India? What can be its implications for the aviation manufacturing ecosystem? Any potential civilian transport use of aircraft?

    Kishore Kumar Khera replies: A contract for procurement of 62 C295 aircraft is under consideration for replacement of 56 HS748 Avro for the Indian Air Force (IAF) and the balance six aircraft for the Indian Coast Guard. Of these, 16 aircraft are to be built by the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and the balance aircraft will be manufactured in India. To facilitate aircraft manufacturing in India, certain Transfer of technology (ToT) is inevitable.

    Atma Nirbhar in Defence Technology

    While the steps stipulated in draft DAP-2020 to enable smooth acquisition of systems indigenously designed by DRDO and other public sector entities are a right move, they need to be strengthened further to make procedures more robust and conducive for timely completion of projects.

    August 10, 2020

    A Comparison of Defence Sector Innovation Ecosystems in China and India

    The defence sector in all major countries has historically been a source of new technologies and innovation. As China and India grow in stature, the strengths of their defence sector ecosystems and the ability to innovate become areas of focus for policymakers. Since defence deals with the security of a nation, all defence ecosystems have some element of government leadership, direction and ownership. Against this must be balanced the need to ensure efficiencies and competitive capabilities, which requires entrepreneurship, private sector companies and the market mechanism.

    January 2020

    Transfer of Defence Technology: Understanding the Nuances and Making it Work for India

    • Publisher: KW Publishers
      2019
    In recent years, transfer of defence technology to India, as an alternate route to indigenous development, has been frequently brought up with widely varying views from the Indian defence technology fraternity. Some lament its failure to help India achieve self-reliance, while others suggest it can enable India to leapfrog ahead. While it has been paradoxically found to be more expensive than outright purchase of defence systems, there are indications that countries such as Israel, South Korea and China have gained immensely from it. While there has been a flood of ToT proposals from foreign OEMs after the launch of the Make in India initiative, there have been few proposals which have materialised and a miniscule number successfully implemented. Acknowledging the need to unravel these mysteries, this book attempts to throw light on the entire range of connected aspects from a brief historical perspective to an understanding of its fundamentals and nuances, to how ToT should be aligned with national goals and there on to its implementation issues. Initially addressing the conventional mode and its complexities, it expands to touch upon the others, then the unconventional ones, the facilitators such as offsets and the transaction in its widest sense. Thus enveloping the complete spectrum, it brings its insights together to converge on a possibly successful arrangement for India. Written in an explorative, questioning style, this book will intrigue interested readers and propel the Indian defence technology community to dwell on its findings and suggestions for the formulation of a cogent way forward.
    • ISBN: 978-93-89137-17-0,
    • Price: ₹.980/-
    • E-copy available
    2019

    Prasad asked: How has globalisation increased the pace of development of military technology and warfare?

    A. Vinod Kumar replies: Globalisation, a post-Cold War phenomenon, entails a plethora of conceptions pertaining to global interdependence of societies, peoples and cultures. In the economic realm, globalisation represents the integration of economies through free trade, driven by lowered tariffs and minimal protectionism.

    Disruptive Technologies for the Militaries and Security

    • Publisher: Springer, Singapore
      2019
    This book debates and discusses the present and future of Disruptive Technologies in general and military Disruptive Technologies in particular. Its primary goal is to discuss various critical and advanced elucidations on strategic technologies. The focus is less on extrapolating the future of technology in a strict sense, and more on understanding the Disruptive Technology paradigm. It is widely accepted that technology alone cannot win any military campaign or war. However, technological superiority always offers militaries an advantage. More importantly, technology also has a great deterrent value. Hence, on occasion, technology can help to avoid wars. Accordingly, it is important to effectively manage new technologies by identifying their strategic utility and role in existing military architectures and the possible contributions they could make towards improving overall military capabilities. This can also entail doctrinal changes, so as to translate these new technologies into concrete advantages.
    • ISBN: E-book-978-981-13-3384-2, Hardcopy-978-981-13-3383-5
    • Price: E-book- € 118.99, Hardcover- € 139,99
    2019

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