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  • Decimating Democracy in 140 Characters or Less: Pakistan Army’s Subjugation of State Institutions through Twitter

    The Directorate General of Inter Services Public Relations (DG-ISPR), or the Pakistan Army’s media wing has perfected the form of subverting democracy and showcasing the dominant position of the Army in the entire Pakistani polity. This article sets out to prove the same in a quantified manner. By analysing almost 25 tweets from the official account of DG-ISPR in the period 2016 −18, the article tries to quantify, using the Merkel-Croissant model of embedded democracy, the priorities of the Pakistan Army.

    March 2019

    The 2017 By-elections in Myanmar: A Warning Signal for Suu Kyi?

    The result of the by-election clearly indicates the need for the NLD government to speedily engender trust among the ethnic minorities. A successful peace process and peace negotiations can be one aspect of it.

    April 05, 2017

    Political Transition, Tatmadaw and Challenges for Myanmar’s Democracy

    This backgrounder offers an overview of the two most challenging concerns for Myanmar’s democracy – ethnic unrest and economic hardships – and how the new government is planning to address these issues in particular and also more generally the influence of the Tatmadaw in politics.

    July 26, 2016

    Shashank Setty asked: What added advantage is democracy going to offer India over China when it comes to India's rise as a future global power?

    S. Kalyanaraman replies: Since a democratic form of government is an expression of the will of the people, India is likely to enjoy greater legitimacy in the domestic and international spheres.

    Danish Mallick asked: Is the Indian strategy of creating democracy deficit in J&K state a viable option to retain territorial integrity?

    Abdul Hameed Khan replies: India’s image as the biggest democracy in the world is robust and well known. India has vigorously promoted democratic practices all along, without exception. Every constituent of its government structure as well as all the established political parties have shown profound respect to it. This goes to establish India’s democratic approach towards all of its states and territories.

    State, Secularism and Democracy

    Democracy has spread spontaneously and swiftly in an area of the world generally thought to be immune to political changes: West Asia and North Africa (WANA). An incident of common occurrence in Third World countries—a policeman extorting money from a fruit vendor—sparked this surge for democracy, which spread rapidly from the Mediterranean to the Red Sea in some two months. On December 17, 2010, a fruit vendor, Mohammed Razzack, set himself on fire to protest against a policeman extorting money from him.

    May 2014

    Southeast Asian democracy: New time and take

    Southeast Asian countries are facing challenging times. Push for further democratisation within the countries and the established regimes resistance to it has the possibility of jeopardising the region’s political stability and which may impede the movement towards a ASEAN Economic Community by 2015.

    April 07, 2014

    International Reactions to the Parliamentary Elections in Bangladesh

    Unlike the major global powers which termed the polls “non-representative”, India – the closest regional ally of Bangladesh, recognised Sheikh Hasina’s victory despite a “record low voter turnout” and supported her in staking claim to form the next government.

    January 28, 2014

    Bangladesh: Should Anti-incumbency Outweigh Growth and Stability?

    The Awami League government may not have done everything right in the last five years, but it has done commendable work by South Asian standards. The Bangladesh economy has grown consistently at about six per cent and the government has done well to contain the extremist forces.

    November 22, 2013

    Stability and Growth in South Asia

    Stability and Growth in South Asia
    • Publisher: Pentagon Press
      2014

    This book examines the forces and processes which have led to relative political stability or unleashed trends in that direction in some countries of South Asia. It also delves into the factors that have stimulated economic growth in some countries, and impeded economic growth in others. Eminent authors from the region examine how far the positive political and economic trends in the region are irreversible or lend themselves to internal convulsions or external influences. There is also a focus on how far inter-state relations within the region have led to stronger intra-regional co-operation, particularly in the economic field.

    • ISBN 978-81-8274-748-7,
    • Price: ₹. 995/-
    • E-copy available
    2014

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