Internal Security: Publications

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  • Unheeded hinterland: identity and sovereignty in northeast India, by Dillip Gogoi

    Partly the result of a political and physical isolation compounded by decades of conflict in the region, Northeast India is often viewed through the prism of security studies, institutional performance or developmental governance. While important contributions in themselves, a state-centric focus often overlooks the complexity of the causes and dynamics. It ignores the consequences of regional societal forces’ articulation of identity, nationalism, separatism and sovereignty that can shape political boundaries in the region, thus overlooking the salience of subaltern narratives.

    January 2017

    The Oil Market Challenge

    Over the last few years, it has been a roller coaster ride for the oil markets. From $110 a barrel in 2010, prices began dropping from June 2014 and finally dropped to below $30 a barrel in January 2016. Then from the end of the first quarter of 2016, prices started recovering and have been hovering around $50 a barrel since May

    September 2016

    Identity, contestation and development in Northeast India by Komol Singha and M. Amarjeet Singh

    Inhabited by numerous tribes and sub-tribes with fierce clan loyalties, the north-east of India has been plagued by identity-inspired insurgencies since independence. The first of these insurgencies was that of the Naga National Council (NNC) in the mid-1950s. Subsequent decades saw the outbreak of other, similar, insurgencies among the Meiteis, Mizos, Assamese and Boroks.

    September 2016

    Use of Chemical and Biological Weapons by Daesh / ISIS

    Chemical and Biological weapons remain a subversive threat to civilizational stability. Biological weapons in particular are a tremendous cause for concern given the difficulty in predicting/preparing for an attack and the complexities of post-attack rehabilitation. Furthermore, the problems of attrition and lack of culpability make it an even more tempting form of warfare for Non State Actors and Extremists. It is important therefore, to examine the current climate of extremism and the potential threat posed by the usage of Chemical and Biological weapons. Having gained access to Iraqi chemical weapon stockpiles, the Islamic State has already engaged in Chemical warfare. This paper attempts to conjecture the possibility of their move towards Biological warfare and the aids/deterrents that could facilitate or block such a transition.

    July-December 2016

    Contribution of Brijesh Mishra in Strategic Affairs and Security Reforms

    The late Sri Brijesh Mishra's perceptive mind and pragmatism in the formulation of foreign and security policies earned him the title of ‘Chanakya of the modern period’. During his long career as a diplomat, he held many important positions and retired from the Indian Foreign Services (IFS) as India's permanent representative in the United Nations (UN).

    March 2013

    Essays on the Kuki–Naga Conflict: A Review

    The Kuki–Naga conflict, which was mainly fought on land and identity issues, resulted in the uprooting of hundreds of villages, with the loss of more than 1,000 lives and enormous internal displacement. The British colonial policy of governance in the north-east frontier of India and the rise of ethnic nationalism among both the Kukis and Nagas in the post-independence period were the roots of the conflict.

    March 2013

    Left-Wing Extremism and Counterinsurgency in India: The ‘Andhra Model’

    India has a long history of left-wing extremism. The largest and most powerful left-wing extremist group today is the Communist Party of India (CPI) (Maoist), which is active in many states across the country. Its ultimate goal is to capture power through a combination of armed insurgency and mass mobilisation. In recent times, the southern state of Andhra Pradesh has achieved notable success in counterinsurgency operations against the Maoists. This article outlines the ‘Andhra model’, which involves a mix of security, development and political approaches.

    July 2013

    Taming India’s Maoists: Surrender and Rehabilitation

    This article seeks to make a preliminary assessment of the surrender and rehabilitation policy being adopted towards Naxalites. The examples/experiences cited in this paper refer largely to cadres and leaders of Communist Party of India (Maoist), or CPI (Maoist). It is part of a multi-pronged conflict management and resolution strategy and is required to be implemented along with firm action by police against those who follow the path of violence.

    November 2013

    Re-examining India's Counterterrorism Approach: Adopting a Long View

    This article looks at the status quo of Indian counterterrorism policy—which largely favours ‘physical’ or ‘hard’ measures—and proposes that the government adopt a more holistic strategy. Termed ‘Countering Violent Extremism’, this would involve measures geared towards long-term prevention, with greater attention paid to the reasons for which people commit terrorism and to the impact of counterterrorism on communities.

    July 2012

    Strategy and Tactics of the Indian Maoists: An Analysis

    Naxals of the Communist Party of India (CPI) (Maoist), better known as Maoists, characterised more than once by the Indian prime minister as the gravest threat to our internal security, have been continuously fine-tuning their strategies and tactics in order to maintain their relevance. On the other hand, the state too has been making concerted efforts by taking ‘security and development’ measures to diminish, if not altogether defeat, the challenge posed by the rebels to the Indian state.

    September 2012

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