Sanjay Badri-Maharaj

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  • Dr. Sanjay Badri-Maharaj is an independent defence analyst and attorney-at-law based in Trinidad and Tobago. He holds a PhD on India's nuclear weapons programme and an MA from the Department of War Studies, Kings College London. He has served as a consultant to the Trinidad and Tobago Ministry of National Security.

    Venezuela’s Political Crisis: Continuing Chaos

    While the willingness of the Maduro regime to silence the opposition is cause for concern, far more worrying is the prospect of the new Constituent Assembly rewriting the Constitution to eliminate the last vestiges of democratic checks and balances.

    August 09, 2017

    Air Support for Internal Security Operations: What India can Learn from Trinidad and Tobago

    Air power has long been recognised as a useful asset in internal security operations, running the full gamut from militarised counter-insurgency (CI) and counter-terrorist (CT) operations to the mundane task of crowd control. In the last 15 years, the archipelagic state of Trinidad and Tobago has made extensive use of air assets for internal security operations, with mixed results. In the process, some lessons have been learnt and some serious mistakes made that can be instructive for even large countries such as India.

    July 2017

    The Tejas One Year After Induction – HAL must take ownership of the project

    The Tejas One Year After Induction – HAL must take ownership of the project

    It behooves both HAL and ADA to work in synergy to meet the target of 16 aircraft per annum and ensure the successful and prompt completion of the Tejas Mk.1A project.

    July 12, 2017

    EMBRAER: Brazil’s Aviation Success Story

    It is difficult for India’s aviation sector to replicate EMBRAER’s success without perhaps a reorientation of priorities.

    July 03, 2017

    Uruguay’s Armed Forces – Maintaining Effectiveness on a Budget

    While Uruguay has been able to preserve the combat capability of its armed forces despite budgetary restrictions, it remains to be seen whether this can continue without substantial infusions of money for capital acquisitions.

    June 20, 2017

    Paraguay’s Military: Internal Security Challenges vs Bloc Obsolescence

    Paraguay’s military faces the twin challenges of maintaining internal and external security, and fighting narco-trafficking while facing bloc obsolescence of its existing assets.

    June 12, 2017

    The Agni-II Trial Failure: Evaluation rather than Flagellation is needed

    The Agni family has had a successful series of user trials extending over several variants and a number of years which should give some confidence in the robustness of the design, development, testing and induction process.

    May 15, 2017

    Globalization of the Jihadist Threat: Case Study of Trinidad and Tobago

    Despite a well-integrated Muslim population, and an environment where there is no tangible discrimination or lack of opportunity, the Jihadist ideology has succeeded in taking root in Trinidad. Links with organized crime have helped fuel the movement and strong links have been forged with ISIS and Al-Qaeda with the result that at least 89 Trinidadians are now in Syria. It is also argued that some Trinidadian Muslims have succumbed to the messages broadcast by ISIS and that the lure of fighting for an Islamic Caliphate has found resonance.

    March 2017

    India’s Relations with the Latin America-Caribbean Region: Prospects and Constraints

    This paper seeks, from a Latin American perspective, to examine India's relations with the Latin America-Caribbean region. It makes a distinction between the hesitant and somewhat apathetic approach of the Indian government towards enhanced ties with the region and the rather more proactive and enthusiastic approach by the Indian business sector which has seen Indian trade with the region growing many fold and increasing at the same rate as China's.

    The Beginning of the End – Carrier operations in Latin America to cease

    Post the decommissioning of the Sao Palo, to be completed by 2020, not a single South American navy will operate an aircraft carrier, perhaps reflecting the relative military decline of the region as well as a recognition that carriers can be expensive prestige projects that are quite ineffective in combat.

    April 07, 2017

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