Ballistic Missile Defence (BMD)

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  • Mosaic Warfare: Redefining Future Battlefield

    Smaller, smarter, potent and cheaper combat entities — linked and networked – will be at the heart of future warfare.

    April 27, 2020

    Israel’s Laser-based Missile Interception System

    The laser-based aerospace defence assets, as and when they are fully developed and deployed, could prove to be a potent deterrent.

    February 07, 2020

    Trump’s Own “Star Wars” The 2019 US BMD Review and What It Augurs for India?

    The Trump administration’s BMDR, released in early 2019, can be described as the most proactive BMD plan since the SDI days with fillip given to areas like directed-energy, addressing gaps in boost-phase interception and harnessing the space frontier. Besides analyzing the BMDR threadbare, this Volume uses a hitherto unexplored cache of documents to reconstruct the anatomy of the India-US BMD dialogue so to ascertain why it failed and what the BMDR augurs for India’s BMD future.

    India’s ASAT Test: Joining the Arms Race in Outer Space?

    An ASAT in itself is not a defensive system that could ‘safeguard’ any asset. Instead, it is an offensive system that could solely be used for retribution in response to an attack on India’s space assets. In that sense, the capability can only be used as a deterrent against a potential rival.

    March 28, 2019

    A Shield Against the Bomb : Ballistic Missile Defence in a Nuclear Environment

    For every major military invention in human history, there has quite always been a countervailing technology. Nuclear weapons have, however, remained an exception. Ballistic missile defence (BMD) has, in recent years, emerged as a formidable means to defend against nuclear-armed delivery systems though yet to prove their total reliability. What does the advent of BMD mean for the nuclear revolution – will it make nuclear weapons obsolete or in turn lead to a new arms race among great powers?

    2019

    Agni 5 Tested: What Next?

    Agni 5 Tested: What Next?

    Weapon development programs are successful when technological innovations are matched with national strategic goals. Further development of the Agni-5 should be based on the objectives of adding to the overall combat potential and augmenting deterrence.

    January 25, 2018

    The Agni-II Trial Failure: Evaluation rather than Flagellation is needed

    The Agni family has had a successful series of user trials extending over several variants and a number of years which should give some confidence in the robustness of the design, development, testing and induction process.

    May 15, 2017

    Prasad M.V. asked: When both MTCR & Hague Code of Conduct aim to prevent the proliferation of ballistic missile, what is the difference between them?

    A. Vinod Kumar replies: The Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) is an export control grouping, on the lines of the Nuclear Supplier Group (NSG), which issues norms and guidelines on the export (or transfer) of missiles and/or related materials and technologies. The Hague Code of Conduct (HCoC), as the nomenclature indicates, is a code of conduct expected of states in handling their ballistic missile systems or inventories.

    Impressions on China’s Second Missile Interceptor Test

    The second Chinese BMD test has a message for India: propel the development of long-range (exo-atmospheric) interception capabilities to mitigate the possibility of further asymmetry on strategic forces.

    February 22, 2013

    Managing India’s Missile Aspirations

    The Agni-VI and Prahaar both signify unnecessary missile projects, which have been developed in the interests of DRDO technical and bureaucratic ambitions rather than the stated interests of India’s nuclear doctrine.

    February 10, 2013

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