Defence Industry

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  • Sumit Sinha asked: What are the characteristics of amphibious operations doctrine of Indian defence organizations?

    Ali Ahmed replies: The joint amphibious operations doctrine for the Indian Armed Forces has been laid down by HQ IDS. It is based on the existing excellent pamphlet on these operations. The issue is also covered in brief in India's Maritime Doctrine published last year. An amphibious operations capability is necessary in light of India's island territories, interests in the Indian Ocean and for an out of area capability if necessary. The formations and assets that are to be employed are earmarked and rehearsed in their roles. The Andaman & Nicobar Command has a major responsibility in this. ANC's Army brigade is readily available for the task. In addition, as in the eighties, it is possible that Army formations in the peninsula are also dual tasked accordingly. The air assets can be assembled with ease, given the flexibility inherent in the Air Force. The Navy has INS Jalashwa and other ships that can take part. Exercises have been held periodically beginning with Trishakti of the mid-eighties. The amphibious operations capability is also relevant in possible future conflicts and would be deployed for posturing, even if not actually employed. The major characteristics would be flexibility, speed of deployment, security both physical and of information, vulnerability both at sea and on landing, etc. The nuclear factor cannot be discounted as well.

    Food for Thought: Optimising Defence Spending

    While India’s latest defence budget has no doubt catered for a sizeable capital component, it may be prudent to reduce costs by switching to more affordable programmes.

    May 07, 2010

    Mahindra’s Giant Leap into Defence Production: The Need for Further Policy Initiatives to Promote Private Sector

    While Mahindra’s foray into defence production and the acquisition of foreign companies demonstrates the private sector’s initiative, the government needs to introduce further reforms to promote the role of private companies in Indian defence industry.

    December 22, 2009

    Defence Acquisitions: The Question of Systemic Inefficienices and Effectiveness

    The effectiveness of the procurement process needs to be viewed in context of the operational and structural readiness of the armed forces. If the existing framework proves to be weak and unable to deliver required levels of military preparedness, the framework may have to be re-laid for its effectiveness and deliverability.

    December 03, 2009

    Will Indian Defence Private Sector Deliver with Recent Policy Changes?

    With the growth of the public sector in Defence Production a large number of industrial units in the Private Sector has also grown with varied scales of operation in areas like outsourcing of raw materials, components, sub-systems, assemblies and sub-assemblies.

    November 24, 2009

    Acquisition Reform - Lessons from Bernard Gray

    If India does not modernize in an evenly spread out manner, it will be faced either with the prospect of its armed forces not being prepared, or rushing to make purchases amidst crises, or creating needless hysteria when frenzied modernization occurs.

    November 10, 2009

    Indian Defence Industry Poised to Grow

    Even as the new amendments incentivise domestic companies to enter defence production, the government has made it clear that it wants a competitive environment in defence industry.

    November 10, 2009

    Need for a Resource Generation and Management Cell in Defence

    The orientation of the existing administrative set up in Service Headquarters and in departments under the Ministry of Defence is to plan for the utilization of defence budget allocation. They are not in a position to pay attention to the aspect of defence receipts.

    November 05, 2009

    F-22 Raptor : Economics versus Technology

    The US Department of Defence has been contemplating whether to lift the ban on F-22 exports, the fifth generation stealth aircraft. This would mean that many of the US allies namely Japan, Israel and others might become interested in procuring the aircraft. For Japan it would provide much needed air superiority to the Japanese Air Force concerned at North Korean long range missiles and nuclear capabilities (even though the US has stationed a dozen F-22s at Kadena air base in Japan since May 2009). Israel would like to get the aircraft to launch any pre-emptive strike on Iran.

    July 13, 2009

    India's Defence Offset Policy

    Although India has established a formal mechanism for implementation of the defence offset policy, the structure and procedures lack the thrust to fulfil the objective of energizing the Indian defence industry. Besides, the policy is not supported by the existing Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and licensing policies. While evidence suggests that domestic industry can absorb offsets, what India needs is an effective body to handle offsets, liberal FDI and licensing policies, and a better banking provision.

    March 2009

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