Multilateralism

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  • Suchak Patel asked: How has COVID-19 impacted multilateral diplomacy? What should be India’s stand regarding post-corona multilateralism?

    Rajeesh Kumar replies: The implications of the COVID-19 pandemic on multilateral diplomacy are multifold. First, it has exposed the current crisis of multilateral institutions and exacerbated their decline. For instance, while the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) seemed more paralysed, agencies like the World Health Organisation (WHO) suffered scepticism of accountability and effectiveness.

    Asia between Multipolarism and Multipolarity

    • Publisher: KW Publishers
      2020
    This book aims to map the Asian power trajectory and the continent’s contemporary journey towards greater multipolarity. This volume examines the impact of plurilateral and multilateral dialogues and cooperative mechanisms on Asia’s security and economic architecture. It is based on the proceedings of the thought-provoking 20th edition of the Asian Security Conference which was held from March 26-28, 2019 at the Manohar Parrikar Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses, New Delhi.
    • ISBN: 9789389137439 ,
    • Price: ₹.1280/-
    • E-copy available
    2020

    Ayush Shukla asked: What is the difference between multilateralism and multi-alignment, and what India needs to follow in International Relations?

    Arpita Anant replies: Simply put, multilateralism refers to the coming together of three or more states, in formal or informal institutional settings, to discuss issues of mutual interest and coordinate their policies. If such a grouping is small in size, it is best referred to as a mini-lateral or plurilateral forum. One example of a plurilateral forum is BRICS, of which India is a member along with Brazil, Russia, China and South Africa.

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