Sujit Dutta

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  • Dr. Sujit Dutta is Senior Fellow at the Institute for Defence Studies and Analysis, New Delhi. Presently he is on lien from IDSA and Professor at Nelson Mandela Centre for Peace and Conflict Resolution, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi. Click here for detailed profile

    'China in SAARC? To What Effect?': A Response to the Debate

    The responses to the arguments that I forwarded in my initial essay, ‘China in SAARC? To What Effect?’, have introduced interesting dimensions to this debate. While most of the respondents have agreed with my proposition that it is premature to think about China's entry into the South Asian regionalist project and that it would introduce complex challenges that would be difficult to manage, they disagree with some of the reasons that I have cited.

    May 2011

    China in SAARC? To What Effect?

    Over the past few years there has been a move by some of the member states of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) to induct China into the regional organisation. China, in turn, has indicated its desire to join. Since other extra-regional states were also keen to be involved, SAARC has opened its doors since 2007 for out-of region states through a new arrangement.

    May 2011

    India’s Season of Summits

    The world needs India as a balancer – in trade, as a market, as an alternative model, and as a world power.

    December 30, 2010

    China’s High Risk India Gamble

    Indian decision makers played down the problems in the India-China relationship for the past decade in the expectation that deepening engagement would influence attitudes at the top level in China and thereby enable hardened positions to soften.

    September 03, 2010

    Securing the Sea Frontier: China's Pursuit of Sovereignty Claims in the South China Sea

    China’s maritime territorial claims, and its diplomatic and military measures to attain them, have caused much regional concern in recent years. The expansive maritime sovereignty claims of China in the South China Sea flow from three key goals: the completion of its incomplete nationalist project of territorial consolidation and unifying the state; the desire to control the contested maritime periphery; and the garnering of sea-based resources such as oil and gas that have assumed critical importance for fuelling the economy of a rapidly modernising China.

    April 2005

    China in Asia: Strategic Goals & Emerging Patterns in its Periphery Policy

    Event: 
    Fellows' Seminar
    December 12, 2008
    Time: 
    1030 to 1300 hrs

    Revisiting China's Territorial Claims on Arunachal

    In recent years, China has again publicly revived its territorial claims over India's northeastern state of Arunachal Pradesh. However, by insisting on these claims, China is making a settlement of the territorial issue virtually impossible and seriously misperceiving public opinion trends in India. China has failed to appreciate that if Arunachal is claimed to be the southern part of Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR), India cannot accept Tibet to be within China.

    July 2008

    China's Claims on Arunachal :Revisiting the Issues

    Event: 
    Fellows' Seminar
    April 05, 2008
    Time: 
    1030 to 1300 hrs

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