Defence Reforms

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  • Defence Reforms: Why is it Critical to Bite the Proverbial Bullet?

    This policy brief attempts to suggest six critical policy imperatives that must act as guidelines for the ongoing attempt at defence reforms.

    September 11, 2017

    The State of the Smaller Latin American Air Forces

    While the larger air forces are capable of sustaining their existing and future inventories for some time to come, the combat assets available to the region’s smaller air forces are facing a problem of pending obsolescence.

    December 22, 2016

    China’s Military Reforms: Is All Well With the PLA?

    China’s Military Reforms: Is All Well With the PLA?

    If PLA doesn’t change its ‘army-centric’ character and make way for professionals with domain expertise, the higher defence organisation will continue to be weak and the reform only in name.

    March 09, 2016

    National Security Decision Making: Overhaul Needed

    National Security Decision Making: Overhaul Needed

    A sub-committee of the CCS must devote time and effort to make substantive recommendations to improve the structures for higher defence management, defence research and development, self-reliance in defence production and the improvement of civil-military relations.

    August 26, 2014

    Dysfunctional Operating Environment in Defence: Removing the Cobwebs

    Dysfunctional Operating Environment in Defence:  Removing the Cobwebs

    The effort to set right the operating environment has to start with creating a mechanism to review the existing devolution of power comprehensively based on clearly defined principles and not in an ad hoc manner.

    November 05, 2014

    United States Reforms to Its Higher Defence Organisation: Lessons for India

    United States Reforms to Its Higher Defence Organisation: Lessons for India

    Democracies of the world have many similarities, notwithstanding the differences in the system of governance and the governmental structure. The decision making by the Higher Defence Organisation (HDO) and the government of the United States and India face similar challenges regardless of the threat perception and the role, size and the employment of the military.

    2014

    British Reforms to Its Higher Defence Organisation: Lessons for India

    British Reforms to Its Higher Defence Organisation: Lessons for India

    All is not right with the Indian Higher Defence Organisation (HDO) became public knowledge, perhaps for the first time, after the Kargil War in 1999. There have been significant changes in the geo-strategic situation and the nature of threat faced by India over the years and yet little has changed in the higher defence management and the HDO of the country.

    2014

    Amit asked: What are the obstacles in bringing about police reforms in India?

    G.K. Pillai replies: The state governments are the single obstacle to bringing about police reforms in the country. The state governments see the police force as a powerful arm to further their short-term interests and, therefore, have been successful in stymieing police reforms in India for over 50 years. Many in the police force have also gone along for their personal interests and also because there is no accountability.

    Post on May 24, 2014

    Defence Reforms – Agenda for the New Government

    Defence Reforms – Agenda for the New Government

    A country’s response to external threats and internal security challenges is based on its defence preparedness, advance planning for contingencies and the political will. The new government will have to make key decisions on different aspects of defence reforms. This Policy Brief puts forward some suggestions.

    May 22, 2014

    Assessing Modernization of the Indian Armed Forces through Budgetary Allocations

    India’s quest for modernization of the armed forces is propelled by the persistent threat to its territorial integrity and the aspiration of becoming a great power. However, there is no clearly defined comprehensive policy, much less a carefully crafted strategy, for time-bound modernization of the armed forces and there is no mechanism in place to steer the modernization programme in a holistic manner. In fact, there is considerable ambiguity about the core question as to what constitutes comprehensive ‘modernization’.

    January 2014

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