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  • Eminent Persons' Lecture Series - Admiral Sunil Lanba on India's Maritime Security Challenges

    Event: 
    Eminent Persons' Lecture Series
    August 24, 2018
    Time: 
    1200 hrs

    South Africa Boosts Naval Capabilities: But can it afford an expansion?

    The RSA may be forced to choose between significantly increasing the budgetary allocations for the SAN and adopting a rotational storage programme to preserve capability while reducing operational costs.

    February 05, 2018

    High End in the Pacific: Envisioning the Upper Limits of India-US Naval Cooperation in Pacific-Asia

    The article argues that India and the United States are poised to strengthen their bilateral strategic convergences, not only in the Indian Ocean but also in Pacific-Asia that lies eastwards of the Malacca Straits, and wherein India’s geo-strategic stakes as well as its military-strategic footprint are likely to increase in the coming years. This would progressively enhance the complementarities between their navies in the western Pacific and its contiguous seas, thereby enabling substantive naval cooperation towards ensuring security and stability in the broader Indo-Pacific region.

    October 2017

    Chinmay Mittal asked: What is the difference between joint naval exercises and joint naval patrolling?

    Abhay Kumar Singh replies: Joint naval exercises and joint naval patrols are maritime activities conducted within the wider ambit of naval diplomacy. Irrespective of their size and political persuasion of their governments, navies engage in bilateral and multilateral diplomacy for both competitive and collaborative purposes. These maritime engagements are aimed at strengthening international cooperation with friendly countries, on the one hand, and signalling capability and intent to deter potential adversaries, on the other.

    China’s Naval Base(s) in the Indian Ocean—Signs of a Maritime Grand Strategy?

    The article assesses China’s Indian Ocean strategy against the backdrop of its naval base development in Djibouti. It argues that China’s naval force posturing stems from a doctrinal shift to ocean-centric strategic thinking and is indicative of the larger gameplan of having a permanent naval presence in the Indian Ocean. China’s maritime strategy comprises four key components. First, to channel naval reinforcements for securing its maritime trade and economic interests in the Indian Ocean Region (IOR)—even as it strengthens the Maritime Silk Road initiative.

    May 2017

    Rising Instability and Regional Naval Modernisation in East Asia

    Considering the complementary interests and interdependencies at stake between China and Japan as also their individual aspirations of nation building through peace and stability, a clash over the Senkakus would only result in a ‘lose-lose’ outcome.

    November 02, 2012

    Indian Ocean Naval Symposium: Uniting the Maritime Indian Ocean Region

    The Indian Ocean, the third largest oceanic expanse in the world, is the birthplace of maritime civilisation and has always been an ‘active’ ocean. It is now perceived to be the world's centre of gravity in strategic terms, proving the prophetic words that are often attributed to A.T. Mahan: ‘Whoever controls the Indian Ocean will dominate Asia … the destiny of the world would be decided on its waters’.

    May 2012

    Aircraft Carriers and India’s Naval Doctrine

    Epic sea battles between aircraft carriers have not recurred after World War II; in the post-war period, most carriers began to retire without even having participated in a battle. Many countries that possessed carriers or were aspiring to get them thus began to re-assess the military-strategic utility of such platforms in the radically altered global geo-strategic environment.

    Summer 2008

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