Nuclear Security Summit (NSS)

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  • China Remains a Proliferation Concern in the Indian Subcontinent

    China Remains a Proliferation Concern in the Indian Subcontinent

    China’s continuing complicity in nuclear proliferation networks would weaken the global nuclear security regime. Hence, China must cooperate with the international community for reinvesting the benefits achieved by the Nuclear Security Summit process, and help develop stronger nuclear security architecture in the Indian subcontinent.

    April 22, 2016

    Moving Cyber from the Orbit to the Nucleus of the Nuclear Security Summit

    Moving Cyber from the Orbit to the Nucleus of the Nuclear Security Summit

    Along with physical and system operational security at nuclear power plants, cybersecurity of electronic assets and computer/ICS networks have also become a major concern.

    March 30, 2016

    Nuclear Security Summit: An Assessment

    In the years to come, a lot more activity on nuclear security can be expected and much of it will arise from the commitment taken by states at the three nuclear security summits and the voluntary pledges undertaken by different countries. A good deal of pressure from civil society and think tanks on nuclear security issues can be expected.

    March 29, 2014

    Does Nuclear Asia have its Own Dangers?

    There are no properly functioning Asian security institutions or regimes to regulate Asia’s nuclear politics and has to rely on global institutions and regimes for regulation of its nuclear politics and management of nuclear order. Treaties like the NPT are struggling to provide stability in the world as in Asia.

    March 28, 2014

    Nuclear Security Summit Process: An Indian Perspective

    The third Nuclear Security Summit will be held in The Hague, Netherlands in March 2014. This visionary nuclear diplomacy will be facing both old and new questions at its third meeting. The basic question relates to the future of the summit process, which has made a significant contribution to international security in a very short span of time. The summit process, however, may serve it better, and the strengthening of the regime must be continued through the next two summits. However, with or without the summit process, the nuclear security regime has to be strengthened.

    March 2014

    Roadmap for Success of the Nuclear Security Summits and Beyond

    The Nuclear Security Summits are at a midway point but have not yet reached their full potential of eliminating weak links in the global nuclear security system. The first two summits, in Washington and Seoul, have had a beneficial impact by identifying common objectives, galvanising international action and reducing stockpiles of vulnerable nuclear materials. However, improving nuclear security governance is an important new issue. It could be introduced at the 2014 summit in The Hague and be a springboard for action at the 2016 summit in the US.

    March 2014

    The Non-Aligned Movement and Nuclear Security

    Despite not taking a stand on nuclear security or nuclear terrorism, the NAM appears determined to adopt key elements of nuclear security.

    March 16, 2012

    India’s Nuclear Security Policy

    Though India has supported and adopted the international legal framework for nuclear security, it has adopted a somewhat unique approach reflecting its policy of cautious activism.

    January 05, 2012

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