JOURNAL OF DEFENCE STUDIES

Sudan – Conflicts, Terror, and Oil

Major Shailender Arya is serving with an artillery regiment.
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  • October 2009
    Volume: 
    4
    Issue: 
    3
    Focus

    Sudan has been at the cross-roads of conflict for years as two bitter civil wars marred the last decade. It is a prisoner of history as the departing British, to prevent Egypt from dominating Sudan, artificially joined the two culturally and ethnically different parts, sowing the seeds of conflict. The Darfur conflict erupted in 2003 and generated a grave humanitarian emergency as the government-supported Arab Janjaweed militia began ethnically cleansing African tribes. For years Sudan was also known as a prime terror destination as a religious right-dominated regime in Khartoum sheltered many terror groups including Al Qaeda and encouraged the growth of radical Islam. International pressure, American sanctions and cruise missiles forced President Bashir to part ways with terror but the remnants of the network are yet to be dismantled from the Sudanese soil. Today, a cocktail of international politics, conflicting oil interests and a visible distrust threaten to again plunge Sudan into another round of civil wars, destabilising the entire Sub-Saharan Africa and crippling a nascent oil economy.

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