Nuclear deal

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  • China’s Reactor Sale to Pakistan: The Known Unknowns

    The reported offer of China to sell 1000 MWe reactors to Pakistan has raised a number of issues. China applied for NSG membership in 2004 only after being satisfied that it can safeguard its nuclear commerce with Pakistan even after joining NSG. It must be clearly understood that China’s application for joining NSG was at the repeated appeals of NSG and not the other way around.

    November 15, 2013

    Urenco is up for sale, is India interested?

    If Chinese companies eventually end up bidding for Urenco, there is no reason why Indian companies should not do so. India can form a joint-venture with counterparts in Brazil, South Africa and, if needed, China (even Russia) using common interests envisioned through forums like the IBSA or BRICS to enter this race.

    November 13, 2013

    China-Pakistan Nuclear Cooperation: Unclear Facts

    There is a lot of inaccuracy and assumption in reporting Chasma 3 nuclear cooperation between China-Pakistan. It is not conceivable in engineering terms as to how a 300 MWe Chasma 3 can be transformed into a 1,000 MWe project.

    April 18, 2013

    China nurtures its nuclear nexus with Pakistan

    China and Pakistan reached a formal agreement in February 2013 to construct a third nuclear reactor in Chashma. This has caused widespread nervousness while making the NSG look weak-kneed.

    April 05, 2013

    Non-Proliferation Lobby Analysts Seek to Corner India on CTBT

    To resolve the challenge posed by the NPT criteria, the best solution would be to amend the NPT and accommodate India as a nuclear weapon state.

    June 03, 2011

    Obama’s visit to India: Is the glass of Indo-US strategic partnership half full or half empty?

    While President Obama’s visit to India in November 2010 should further strengthen the Indo-US strategic partnership, some issues have the potential of clouding the relationship. Both sides should be sensitive to each other’s concerns and focus on areas such as space cooperation to give the relationship greater dynamism.

    October 25, 2010

    If India Tests? The Implications for the Indo-U.S. Civil-Nuclear Deal

    In the event of a test, it’s a safe bet that several factors will play into determining U.S. response. This response will be constrained by the strength of the U.S.-India relationship. Further, due to India's deepening nuclear ties with the rest of the world, any U.S. response may have only a modest impact on India.

    August 26, 2010

    Chinese and American Muscle-flexing in South-China Sea: Implications for India

    India has to calibrate its relationship with China, the US, and countries of East Asia with great circumspection in the wake of the resurfacing of tensions in the South China Sea.

    August 19, 2010

    Anand asked: What is China’ real motive behind nuclear deal with Pakistan? What may the reaction of India in this context?

    Jaganath Panda replies: China’s nuclear deal with Pakistan by and large implies two things: first, the Chinese plan of empowering Pakistan and preserving a counter-balancing posture to the rising Indo-US strategic engagement. In that context, the nuclear deal is a constructive assurance from the Chinese that it remains an “all-weather” friend to Islamabad. Second, the Chinese intention is to balance the regional order and slowly make a productive impact on smaller countries in the South Asian region through strategic agreements and deals. It is a progressive Chinese attempt to revitalize its current South Asia policy and uphold regional supremacy. The impact of this deal is huge. The deal would facilitate states that falls outside the nonproliferation purview and accord them the amenities and rights originally intended for members who follow nonproliferation rules, and may prompt a severe arms race in South Asia. As far as India is concerned, there is bound to be concerns as the nuclear deal between China and Pakistan would free-up Pakistani resources for research reactors at Khusab, which would result in greater quantities of plutonium available for the nuclear weapons programme. At the same time, India is also worried about Pakistan’s vulnerable domestic political situation and poor proliferation record which could de-stabilize the region.

    Iran-Turkey Nuclear Swap Deal

    While the Turkey deal represents an advance on the Iran nuclear issue, it remains to be seen if it would lead to more constructive solutions in addressing concerns generated by the Iranian nuclear programme.

    May 19, 2010

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