Nepal

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  • PLA Integration into the Nepal Army: Challenges and Prospects

    Integration of Maoist combatants into the Nepal Army (NA) has become a contentious issue. Although the stakeholders have agreed on the integration process, they are yet to arrive at a consensus on how to attempt it. They have changed their positions frequently over the issue, which has complicated matters further. The NA holds the view that the lack of conventional training of Maoist combatants, as well as their ideological orientation, would have a serious effect on its professional standards.

    September 2009

    The imperative of a national government in Nepal

    Nepal Prime Minister Madhav Kumar Nepal, who heads a twenty-two party coalition government, chose India for his first official foreign visit after assuming office two months back. This ‘goodwill’ visit was undertaken against the background of Nepal’s increasingly fragile peace process. The bilateral agenda was just a pretext. What brought him to New Delhi were several domestic factors. While this is not to say that there are no urgent bilateral issues between the two countries, the most crucial factor today is India’s support for Nepal’s coalition government.

    August 24, 2009

    The Future of the Peace Process in Nepal

    Event: 
    Fellows' Seminar
    August 07, 2009
    Time: 
    1030 to 1300 hrs

    Brief on India’s Neighbourhood

    Terrorism, maritime security and border management are the key challenges in India's neighbourhood

    May 28, 2009

    Ethnic unrest ends in Terai after agreement; PLA commanders urge Dahal to speed up the integration process; Nepal-India Water Resources Committee meets in New Delhi

    9-15 March 2009
    Volume: 
    3
    Issue: 
    1
    2009

    Indigenous organizations, including the Tharus of the Terai region, withdrew their protests after the signing of a six-point agreement with the government on March 14. Both sides agreed to amend the constitutional and legal provisions relating to the independent identities of indigenous nationalities, Muslims and other minorities.

    Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

    China’s Inroads into Nepal: India’s Concerns

    The political crisis that triggered off in Nepal with Prime Minster Prachanda’s resignation yet again indicates not only the trials and tribulations of a fledgling democratic process but also points to the geopolitical vulnerability of the country sandwiched as it is between the two Asian giants. While India considers Nepal a part of its sphere of influence, it is increasingly being challenged by China’s inroads into Nepal. In fact, the growing Nepal-China nexus should be seen in the context of India-China power competition in Asia.

    May 18, 2009

    Nepal: Precarious Peace Process

    Ever since the peace agreement signed between the Maoists and Nepal government in 2006, Nepal has been in the middle of political crisis delaying the constitution making process. The recent row between the Nepal Army and the government leading to the resignation of Prime Minister, Pushpa Kamal Dahal protesting the President’s intervention in the decision, has aggravated the situation further. The fact is that UCPN-Maoist is not only the largest political party in the Parliament but also important to the success of peace process. The House needs two-third’s majority to pass the bills.

    May 14, 2009

    Reports: Maoist curriculum still being taught in western district schools; China pledges increased aid to Nepal as well as help in other infrastructure projects; British minister pledges help in the integration of the Maoist combatants

    April 13-19, 2009
    Volume: 
    4
    Issue: 
    3
    2009

    Reports noted that despite the peace process and Maoists’ joining mainstream politics, subjects like warfare and weaponry were still being taught in Maoist-run schools in the Rukum, Rolpa and Salyan districts of Nepal. Students were also being taught about communist revolutions as well as the history of communist leaders like Mao Zedong, Karl Marx and Vladimir Lenin.

    Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

    Nepal: New ‘Strategic Partner’ of China?

    There has been a major shift in China’s foreign policy towards Nepal since the Maoist ascendance to power. China had earlier adopted a policy of ‘non-intervention’ in the internal matters of Nepal and largely stayed out of Nepalese internal politics. However, the demise of the monarchy and the ascendance of political parties have forced China to reshape its Nepal policy. Moreover, frequent protests by Tibetans in recent months alerted the Chinese to the possibility of the China-Tibet border being misused.

    March 30, 2009

    An Exploratory Framework for India’s relationship with ‘New Nepal’

    Event: 
    Fellows' Seminar
    January 16, 2009
    Time: 
    1030 to 1300 hrs

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