Afghanistan

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  • Terrorism, ideology and misconceptions

    Terrorism is at the forefront of international politics and is a major crisis of our age. Not found in pre-modern times, this phenomenon finds its root in ideological movements and not in religion. While referring to different forms of terrorism several scholars have suggested nihilism in modern times as the source of the problem. They view nihilism as a decline in values, or in other words, a tendency of ‘devaluing all values’.

    May 18, 2009

    Obama proposes $1.6 billion civilian assistance for Afghanistan; Adm. Mulllen: Violence levels will go up in coming months; Afghanistan expresses concern over Islamic Sharia Peace Deal in northwestern Pakistan;

    April 13-19, 2009
    Volume: 
    4
    Issue: 
    3
    2009

    US President Barack Obama, in a supplemental budgetary request, urged Congress to release $1.6 billion of economic assistance to Afghanistan, which will go towards meeting his commitment of increased civilian aid to the country. Additionally, the Obama administration has requested $3.6 billion to help man, train, and equip the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSFs), including the Afghan National Army (ANA) and the Afghan National Police Force.1

    Domestic Support, National Interest and the US War on Terror

    Pakistan’s counter-terrorism performance has received much attention. However, the United States’ capacity to sustain the ‘War on Terror’ needs greater attention, because Washington is the principal state leading the global fight against terrorism. Defeating and routing Al Qaeda was the core objective of the United States following the September 11 attacks, according to former Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) counterterrorism expert Paul Pillar. Washington was prepared to live with the extremist Taliban if its leadership snapped ties and handed over the top leadership of Al Qaeda.

    April 13, 2009

    NATO at 60: A Reality Check

    The Alliance is facing a challenge in Afghanistan operationally and the issue of coherence organisationally.

    April 02, 2009

    NATO in Afghanistan: Fault lines in the transatlantic alliance?

    An amicable resolution of issues between America and Europe on addressing the Afghan quagmire is unlikely given that the end state is not clearly defined.

    April 02, 2009

    Injecting New Dynamism in US-Australia Ties

    Labour Party Prime Minister of Australia, Kevin Rudd, has been in office for nearly one and a half years after his unexpected victory over John Howard in late 2007. For almost three decades after World War II, Australia systematically repudiated the idea of being identified as an Asian country, until the resource boom in the early 1970s that catapulted Australia as one of the major resource exporters to resource-importing countries such as Japan and now China. Since then, Australia’s external orientation has undergone a profound change.

    April 01, 2009

    Talking to the Taliban: Will it Ensure 'Peace' in Afghanistan?

    The raging Taliban-led insurgency in Afghanistan underlines the limits of the use of military force. The lack of visible progress on the reconstruction activity and prevailing insecurity has alienated the Afghan populace in the remote villages of South and East Afghanistan. Given that the military option alone has limited utility in Counter-insurgency (COIN), there is a need to exercise an 'out-of-the-box' option to address the present stalemate.

    March 2009

    Obama’s New Engagement Policy Towards Japan

    US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s recent four-stop swing through Asia – Japan, Indonesia, South Korea and China – in her first tour as Secretary of State represented a strong new beginning for America’s Asia diplomacy. Relations between the US and China and the US and Japan at the moment are free of any acrimony and generally good. However, the recent global economic meltdown has affected the major Asian economies such as Japan and China to some extent given their heavy dependence for exports on the American market.

    March 09, 2009

    There can be no “grand bargain” with terrorism

    In a report titled “President Obama’s Policy Options in Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA)”, Hassan Aabbas, Fellow at the Michigan-based Institute for Policy and Understanding (ISPM), argues that the US “should help India, Pakistan and Afghanistan reconcile their differences in lieu of the tensions in the region.

    February 18, 2009

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