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  • The Unfinished War in Afghanistan: 2001-2014

    The Unfinished War in Afghanistan: 2001-2014
    • Publisher: Pentagon Press
      2014

    This book makes a modest attempt to contribute to the ongoing debate on future challenges for Afghanistan as the largest ever coalition of Western forces prepares to withdraw. It seeks to examine key political developments within Afghanistan over the last one decade in response to the US-led Western military and political intervention.

    • ISBN 978-81-8274-762-3,
    • Price: ₹. 1495/-
    • E-copy available
    2014

    Implications of the Taliban’s 2015 Spring Offensive

    Implications of the Taliban’s 2015 Spring Offensive

    Shifting the centre of gravity of fighting from their traditional strongholds in the South to the northern parts of Afghanistan in this operation is indicative of the Taliban’s shift in focus to other regions that are also in the al Qaeda’s radar.

    May 06, 2015

    Afghanistan and the Region

    Afghanistan and the Region

    Answers to all of Afghan problems can easily be found within the regional context. But the Afghan leadership is not likely to uphold the regional choice now.

    April 20, 2015

    Afghanistan’s Political Reconciliation Policy: Ill Conceived and Self-Defeating

    The Afghan government’s peace and reconciliation overtures to the militants, initially at the unofficial level but later sanctioned officially, have formed a key theme of state security policy from the early days of the post-Taliban administration in Afghanistan. Yet far from producing peace and stability, they seem to have played into the hands of the violent groups intent on overthrowing the country’s internationally supported and legitimate political system in the past decade.

    July 2014

    The Limits of ‘Hybrid Governance’ in Afghanistan

    The following commentary argues that the strategic and structural solutions proffered by advocates of ‘hybrid’ governance—encompassing elements from distinctly different ideological backgrounds or schools of thought—ignore or fail to address certain inherent shortcomings in their approach that are counter-productive to the ongoing and long-term statebuilding and peacebuilding projects in Afghanistan. The following study elucidates some of these shortcomings.

    July 2014

    Ashraf Ghani: America’s New Subedar?

    Ashraf Ghani: America’s New Subedar?

    President Ghani has extended an open invitation to the US for an open-ended military presence in Afghanistan and has also virtually expressed a readiness to play the role of a ‘frontline state’ for any future American contingency.

    April 07, 2015

    Out of Afghanistan: US Needs to Rethink its Afghan Policy

    Out of Afghanistan: US Needs to Rethink its Afghan Policy

    The US and other countries, including India, should open the floodgates of military and economic assistance to the Afghan state and help build the capacity and capability of its security forces and administrative machinery.

    March 24, 2015

    Total Recount in Afghanistan: What Next?

    Total Recount in Afghanistan: What Next?

    As all the votes cast in the run-off election are audited and recounted under international supervision, the final outcome could be a close finish with winning candidate leading by a much narrow margin. The process of constitutional amendment can only be initiated after the new parliament is formed as parliamentary elections are due in 2015.

    July 26, 2014

    Ballot Box Distress and Future of Afghanistan

    Ballot Box Distress and Future of Afghanistan

    The recently concluded Afghan Presidential election, rather than facilitating crucial political transition, is mired in controversy. An early resolution is crucial both for Afghanistan and the international community. For Afghanistan, a peaceful and non-controversial transition would ensure the legitimacy of the upcoming government and push the twin processes of reconciliation and democratization forward.

    July 30, 2014

    Difficulties of Regional Cooperation for Afghanistan: An Alternative Interpretation

    This article addresses the question of why regional cooperation among Afghanistan’s neighbours has been so difficult despite these countries’ common concerns. To answer this question, Afghanistan is conceptualised as placed at the core of overlapping regions: South Asia, the Middle East, Central Asia and, through China’s influence, East Asia. Over the past decade, interactions among different regions ‘through’ Afghanistan have increased, and overlap has intensified.

    March 2015

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