India-Bangladesh Relations

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  • Impact of West Bengal Politics on India–Bangladesh Relations

    It was expected that Prime Minister Manmohan Singh's visit to Dhaka in September 2011 would transform India–Bangladesh relations. However, this did not happen as India could not sign the Teesta water sharing agreement, the biggest deliverable of the visit. It also made some people brand West Bengal (Paschimbanga) Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee as a spoiler.

    May 2013

    Can Robust Bilateral Cooperation on Common Rivers between Bangladesh and India Enhance Multilateral Cooperation on Water Security in South Asia?

    The Himalayan river system, which is made up of the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna rivers, has a combined drainage area that covers the countries of China, India, Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh. The basin of the Indus river, which originates in the Tibetan plateau, is the lifeline of regions in China, Pakistan, India and Afghanistan.

    May 2013

    Manudev Jain asked:What is the issue of land enclaves between India and Bangladesh, and how it is being resolved?

    Reply: Refer to an earlier reply by Anand Kumar to a similar query, at http://idsa.in/askanexpert/enclavesbetweenIndiaandBangladesh

    Also, refer to the following publications by the IDSA research faculty:

    Smruti S. Pattanaik (ed.), Four Decades of India Bangladesh Relations: Historical Imperatives and Future Direction, Gyan Publishing House, New Delhi, 2012, at
    http://www.idsa.in/book/FourDecadesofIndiaBangladeshRelations
    India-Bangladesh Relations: Towards Convergence”, IDSA Task Force Report, 2011.
    Pushpita Das, The India-Bangladesh Border: A New Beginning, IDSA Web Comment, October 10, 2011.
    Pushpita Das, Enclaves and Adverse Possessions: Time to deliver on the promise”, IDSA Web Comment, December 27, 2010.
    Pushpita Das, “India-Bangladesh Border Management: A Review of Government's Response”, Strategic Analysis, 32 (3), May 2008.
    Pushpita Das, ‘The India-Bangladesh Border: "A Problem Area for Tomorrow"’, IDSA Web Comment, December 8, 2006
    N. S. Jamwal, “Border Management: Dilemma of Guarding the India-Bangladesh Border”, Strategic Analysis, 28 (1), January 2004.

    Political Turbulence in Bangladesh Fails to Dampen the Indian President’s Visit

    Pranab Mukherjee’s visit to Bangladesh has made clear that the security situation in that country is under control and it is the BNP that has to overcome its mental block to make a new beginning.

    March 08, 2013

    Aftermath of Salman Khurshid’s Visit to Bangladesh: A Role for West Bengal Too

    India should grasp the opportunities which are discernible in the political horizon in Bangladesh and deepen relations through engagement at the track two tier involving India’s political parties as well as by involving West Bengal as a major partner.

    February 20, 2013

    Krishnakanth asked: Is there any document providing authentic information regarding enclaves between India and Bangladesh?

    Anand Kumar replies: There may not be one or single document providing authentic information regarding so many enclaves. But a 520-page historical study of the enclaves has been done by Brendan R. Whyte at the University of Melbourne in 2002. This study has large number of documents which throw light on the issue.

    Cooperation Between India and Bangladesh on Control of Arsenic Poisoning

    India and Bangladesh need to work together in the field of health and medical research to devise expedient measures to contain the menace of arsenic poisoning of ground water.

    January 28, 2013

    Sandeep asked: Was it a lack of foresight on the part of India that it did not ask for land transit facilities when Bangladesh got independence?

    P.K. Gautam replies: These are ad hoc and post event figments of imagination. It was clearly not a lack of foresight. Too many aims and wish lists would have diluted India’s strategic objectives. The political leadership of Bangladesh was also not fully formed, and it would have been a poor judgement, rather complete lack of foresight, to have asked for such favours.

    A country cannot behave like a proverbial camel that enters a tent pushing the owner out. Good diplomacy has to have a stop and an exit. I also find some now desiring and saying that India should have kept areas of Chittagong for better connectivity to the north eastern region. There is no end to these theoretical counterfactuals, and I think India did just the right thing. Transit passage etc., is an issue of continued diplomacy as part of foreign policy which is now slowly emerging.

    Aftermath of Begum Khaleda Zia`s Visit to India

    The goodwill built up during Khaleda Zia’s recent India visit needs to be capitalised upon judiciously, by keeping a manifestly even-handed stance on the internal politics of Bangladesh.

    November 12, 2012

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