Maritime Security

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  • The Dragon has landed for the American Eagle

    Sino-US rivalry has been simmering for the past many years, as China has replaced Russia in the American scheme of things as its most potent adversary.

    October 13, 2010

    Jiaolong - An Underwater Dragon

    Once the Chinese achieve the capability of producing UUVs with deep depth capability, they could surround India by placing these submersibles at strategic places.

    September 16, 2010

    Maneesh Aggarwal asked: India has Andman & Nicobar and Lakshdweep, we can use them as our Naval and Airforce Strong base to guard India or break of String of Pearls

    S. S. Parmar replies: The 572 islands of the Andaman and Nicobar chain running in a north south direction of around 780 km long places this eastern most “Outpost” of India close to the South East Asian nations on Chinas’ radar scan.

    Although we have an integrated command based at Port Blair and a number of Naval, Air Force and Coast Guard bases, the assets (in this regards I refer to ships and aircraft) presently, are not sufficient to place the vast sea area and islands under surveillance. A number of the Islands are uninhabited and offer a safe haven for elements inimical to the security of India.

    As and when the required numbers of assets are available there would be the requirement of placing them at places that offer logistics support that would require the requisite infrastructure to be constructed. More importantly these places or bases would require to be in close proximity of navigable choke points so that the time required to reach the area would be the shortest.

    There are two points to be kept in mind. Firstly, aircraft given the speed and potent reach are always considered an omni present threat. The nations adjoining the area would question our intentions. We may reason and give the rationale of anti piracy and anti smuggling but it may not go down well with them. Secondly infrastructure to support these assets would require to be constructed. There would be a requirement to duplicate and maybe triplicate similar infrastructure given the extent of the Island chain. This would be a costly affair.

    Tackling Somali Piracy Ashore: Maritime Security and Geopolitics in the Indian Ocean

    As high-profile incidents of piracy become more common off Somalia, strategists have taken to urging the US government to send expeditionary forces ashore. The article uses history and Clausewitzian theory to estimate the nature of the threat and the likely efficacy of a land campaign. Even successful operations would entail costs exceeding the value of the political stakes. For this reason alone, going ashore is inadvisable.

    September 2010

    Improving Policy Responses to Piracy in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden Region: What Role for India?

    The participation of the Indian navy in anti-piracy operations off the Somali coast is perceived by many as a manifestation of India's apparent willingness to take on a larger role on the global stage. This article explores the possibility for India to play a more important role in solving the Somali piracy crisis.

    July 2010

    Kovid Kumar asked: What are the future prospects of India and Japan maritime relations?

    Rajaram Panda replies: The present level of cooperation between India and Japan in the maritime domain is good and the future could be better. Both are heavily dependent on imports of oil from the Persian Gulf. Therefore securing critical energy supply routes provides scope for close naval cooperation. India’s geographical position qualifies it to play a critical strategic role in ensuring maritime safety. The Indian Navy has proved its usefulness in this regard and the Japanese are grateful for the Indian Navy’s rescue of the Japanese vessel MV Alondra Rainbow which was hijacked by pirates in November 1999. The Eight-fold Initiatives for Strengthening Japan-India Global Partnership of April 2005 provides the framework for joint exercises against piracy, information sharing, technical assistance, cooperation between Coast Guards, etc. As threats to maritime trade and energy supplies from State and non-State actors continue to increase, one can envisage consolidation of the existing cooperation between India and Japan as well as the further strengthening of such cooperation in future.

    China’s String of Pearls and India’s Enduring Tactical Advantage

    Not only would the presence of Chinese vessels present no real existential threat to Indian naval dominance in the region, it would also, paradoxically, provide the Indian Navy with a far greater degree of tactical flexibility in the event of a future conflict with China, be it on land or at sea.

    June 08, 2010

    Securing India's Littorals

    Given the complexity and trans-national nature of the challenges, the paper explores solutions for enhancing littoral security, maritime domain awareness and response mechanisms.

    April 2009

    China and Francophone Western Indian Ocean Region: Implications for Indian Interests

    The cooperation between China and Francophone Western Indian Ocean region is now getting more visible, particularly after the China-Africa summit in November 2006. China's new thrust in the Francophone Western Indian Ocean region was though framed within China's broader Africa policy, however there is indeed the centrality of maritime considerations. China seems to have a higher level of physical presence in the Francophone Western Indian Ocean's various island states than would be warranted by its present levels of trade and other economic activities.

    October 2009

    India, Maldives and the Indian Ocean

    The August 2009 bilateral pact will fortify the security of the Maldives as well as cater to Indian security concerns on the terrorism and geopolitical fronts.

    October 13, 2009

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