Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)

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  • Biological Weapons: Coronavirus, Weapon of Mass Destruction? by U.C. Jha and K. Ratnabali

    War, when all else fails. The reasons for war could be ideological or for greater control over finite resources but war invariably has violence at its epicentre. Ethics and wars have rarely been concentric in human history; therefore, wars have seen the employment of all possible means. Victory, as the ultimate aim, has forced warring sides to look at multiple options and biological weapons are one such method. Biological weapons are as old as war itself and their primitive recorded use was centuries ago.

    January-March 2021

    Avinash asked: What is the difference between ‘credible minimum deterrence’, ‘strategic deterrence’ and ‘full spectrum deterrence’?

    A. Vinod Kumar replies: Strategic Deterrence has traditionally (especially during the Cold War) been associated with nuclear weapons - possession of capability to undertake unacceptable destruction and deterring the adversary by posturing the ability and intent to do so. The strategic environment of post-Cold War period, however, witnessed the advent of newer threats beyond the realm of nuclear deterrence.

    Avinash Kiran asked: Were there reasons other than the presence of chemical weapons that led the Western countries particularly the US to bring about a regime change in Iraq in 2003? More recently, why are they trying to change the regime in Syria ?

    Md. Muddassir Quamar replies: The stated reasons for the 2003 Iraq war were presence of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and harbouring of terrorists that subsequently proved to be exaggerated and erroneous. The actual reason was lingering problems between the United States (US) and Iraq since early 1990s. Iraq had attacked and annexed Kuwait in August 1990. The US responded by launching Operation Desert Storm to liberate Kuwait, which was achieved in January 1991.

    Mother of All Bombs: A New Age Weapon of Mass Destruction?

    Given the advertisement surrounding the use of MOAB, it is possible that the Trump administration is signalling to its adversaries the very lethal weapons in its arsenal and its willingness to use them.

    April 18, 2017

    The Importance of Passive and Active CBRN Defensive Measures

    The key to calling Pakistan’s nuclear bluff lies in ensuring that the Indian armed forces are prepared to meet the threat of use of tactical nuclear weapons.

    October 17, 2016

    North Korea’s ‘Chemistry’ with WMDs

    North Korea has blatantly breached the chemical weapons ‘red line’ in the killing of the half-brother of Kim Jong-un in Kuala Lumpur on February 13.

    March 06, 2017

    India’s Policy towards WMD Weapons: Status and Trends

    India has always been a peace loving nation and have distant itself from unwanted wars. After the introduction of the weapons of mass destruction, India has followed an unique path to preserve its identity as a global power in the world arena. It has supported the convention on Chemical and Biological weapons.

    January-June 2016

    Syria and WMD: Deepening Uncertainty

    Even as the uncertainty over the alleged use of chemical weapons use in Syria deepens, the cautious US response to the situation has been conditioned by the lack of viable military options as well as its Iraq war experience.

    June 03, 2013

    NBC threats and India's Preparedness

    With new developments in the field of science and technology it is becoming very tough for countries to change the level of security preparedness. It is also becoming increasingly difficult for a country to undertake correct threat assessment. While the state's security is relatively assured with the obsolescence of major wars, the non-state actors are found using innovative techniques to spread the divisive politics.

    The Beginning of the End in Syria

    The WMD insinuation by the West, the debate over the impending genocide in Aleppo, and the swelling ranks of refugees, all point to an orchestrated shift in the narrative of the conflict that makes external intervention an ‘inevitability’.

    August 07, 2012

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