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  • Laxman Kumar Behera

    Research Fellow
    Email: 
    laxmanbehera@gmail.com
    Phone: 
    +91 11 2671 7983 Extn 7122
    Archive data: Person was Research Fellow at IDSA till September 2020

    Dr. Laxman Kumar Behera joined MP-IDSA in September 2006. He specialises on issues related to Arms Procurement, Defence Offsets, Defence Industry, Military Spending, and Export Control. Dr. Behera has authored numerous policy-relevant research publications. His book Indian Defence Industry: An Agenda for Making in India provides a comprehensive analysis of India’s evolving arms manufacturing sector. Dr. Behera has given numerous talks on defence, security and finance related issues in prestigious training and academic institutes, including College of Defence Management, National Academy of Defence Production, National Institute of Financial Management and Indian Institute of Management Bangalore. Dr. Behera was closely associated with several high level Committees set up by the Ministry of Defence to examine Defence Acquisition and Defence Expenditure. He worked as a Consultant to the Taskforce on Defence Modernisation and Self-reliance, constituted by the National Security Council Secretariat. The Report, presented to the Prime Minister, had been the basis for several reforms carried through the Defence Procurement Procedures (DPP). He has been part of three IDSA study teams that prepared reports for the Seventh Central Pay Commission; Expenditure Management Commission, Ministry of Finance; and Director General (Acquisition), MoD.

    Select Publications

    • Even as the new amendments incentivise domestic companies to enter defence production, the government has made it clear that it wants a competitive environment in defence industry.

      November 10, 2009
      IDSA Comments
    • Chair: Vinod Kumar Misra
      Discussants: V. K Chopra and G Balachandran

      August 28, 2009
      Events
    • The present global economic crisis has slowed down the growth of the Indian economy, affecting among others, the fiscal situation and the revenue mobilisation potential of the central government. Defence being one of the largest recipients of central government expenditure, the present crisis casts a doubt on the adequacy of future resources. This commentary discusses some major options that India’s Ministry of Defence needs to consider in order to withstand the likely resource constraints in the coming years.

      May 26, 2009
      IDSA Comments
    • Although India has established a formal mechanism for implementation of the defence offset policy, the structure and procedures lack the thrust to fulfil the objective of energizing the Indian defence industry. Besides, the policy is not supported by the existing Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and licensing policies. While evidence suggests that domestic industry can absorb offsets, what India needs is an effective body to handle offsets, liberal FDI and licensing policies, and a better banking provision.

      Strategic Analysis
    • Strategic Analysis
    • Strategic Analysis
    • In its interim budget for 2009-10 the Union Government has allocated Rs. 1,41,703 crores for the country’ Defence Services that include three Armed Forces (i.e., the Army, the Navy and the Air Force), and other Departments, primarily Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) and Defence Ordnance Factories. This is apart from Rs. 24,960 crores which have been earmarked to defray civil expenditures of Ministry of Defence (MoD) and its affiliated organisations, including, the Coast Guard, and for defence pension (Rs. 21,790 crores).

      February 18, 2009
      IDSA Comments
    • Definition, Forms and Types of Offsets Offsets

      Journal of Defence Studies
    • The Ministry of Defence (MoD) recently issued a new set of rules for the procurement of arms, ammunition and other defence related products and services. The rule book, known as Defence Procurement Procedure 2008 (DPP 2008), has revised, among others, the offset policy that was first promulgated in 2005 and subsequently revised in 2006. The revised offset policy which retains the earlier minimum 30 per cent offset requirements in defence imports of Rs. 300 crore or more has added a provision of offset banking, besides enlisting a number of categories of defence products.

      August 19, 2008
      IDSA Comments
    • In early May 2008 Tata Group of India and Israel Aerospace Industries Ltd (IAI) signed an agreement to establish a joint venture (JV) in India to develop, produce and support defence products such as missiles, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), radars, electronic warfare (EW) systems and homeland security (HLS) systems. The agreement is in sync with Tata’s broader objective of becoming a “lead system integrator” in the Indian private sector, by consolidating its own resources, diversifying into various fields of production and forging partnerships with major global defence companies.

      June 17, 2008
      IDSA Comments

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