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  • Laxman Kumar Behera

    Research Fellow
    Email: 
    laxmanbehera@gmail.com
    Phone: 
    +91 11 2671 7983 Extn 7122
    Archive data: Person was Research Fellow at IDSA till September 2020

    Dr. Laxman Kumar Behera joined MP-IDSA in September 2006. He specialises on issues related to Arms Procurement, Defence Offsets, Defence Industry, Military Spending, and Export Control. Dr. Behera has authored numerous policy-relevant research publications. His book Indian Defence Industry: An Agenda for Making in India provides a comprehensive analysis of India’s evolving arms manufacturing sector. Dr. Behera has given numerous talks on defence, security and finance related issues in prestigious training and academic institutes, including College of Defence Management, National Academy of Defence Production, National Institute of Financial Management and Indian Institute of Management Bangalore. Dr. Behera was closely associated with several high level Committees set up by the Ministry of Defence to examine Defence Acquisition and Defence Expenditure. He worked as a Consultant to the Taskforce on Defence Modernisation and Self-reliance, constituted by the National Security Council Secretariat. The Report, presented to the Prime Minister, had been the basis for several reforms carried through the Defence Procurement Procedures (DPP). He has been part of three IDSA study teams that prepared reports for the Seventh Central Pay Commission; Expenditure Management Commission, Ministry of Finance; and Director General (Acquisition), MoD.

    Select Publications

    • Ground reality rather than fiscal prudence should guide the Finance Minister while finalising the defence budget for 2011-12.

      February 23, 2011
      IDSA Comments
    • In the absence of reforms in several areas, DPP-2011 may not be able to achieve its stated objectives of expeditious procurement and greater involvement of domestic industry in defence production.

      January 25, 2011
      Issue Brief
    • Chairperson: Shri V K Misra
      Discussants: Shri Amit Kumar Singh and Shri Rahul Gangal

      December 30, 2010
      Events
    • India’s increasing reliance on FMS route is indicative of its desperation to bridge the gaps in its defence preparedness and shows the weakness of the Defence Procurement Procedure.

      October 08, 2010
      IDSA Comments
    • Although India’s defence planning mechanism has evolved over the years, it is still inadequate with respect to prioritisation of precious resources, optimum force suture and creation of a strong domestic defence industrial base. Given India’s complex security environment and massive expenditure on national defence, the planning mechanism needs to be strengthened by articulation of national security objectives and creation of Chief of Defence Staff (CDS).

      Journal of Defence Studies
    • India's raised its defence budget for 2010-11 by 3.98 per cent to Rs. 1,47,377 crore. This allocation represents 2.12 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP), which is below the global average of 2.5 per cent. Considering the void in defence preparedness and the rising military expenditure and capability in neighbourhood, India needs to increase its defence spending to around 2.5-3.0 per cent of GDP. However, the increase in allocation has to go with reforms in capital acquisition system, which in present form is unable to spend the allocated resources.

      Journal of Defence Studies
    • India has established eight Defence Public Sector Undertakings (DPSUs) whose responsibility is to provide the Armed Forces state-of-the-art equipments and at the same time enhance country's self-reliance in defence production. However the performance of these Undertakings is not up to the mark, resulting in import of arms worth billions of dollars every year. A deeper insight into DPSUs' production profile reveals that most of them are over-dependent on external sources for the production needs, and have a very low labour productivity level, negligible export, and a low R&D base.

      Journal of Defence Studies
    • In past two decades, the Army has witnessed a decrease in its share in the overall budget, whereas the Navy and the Air Force have increased their respective shares. This reflects a shifting priority, from land-centric armed force to an air and naval-centric force.

      Journal of Defence Studies
    • If the Finance Ministry’s emphasis on fiscal prudence and inclusive growth has resulted in a smaller increase in the latest defence budget, the Report of the Thirteenth Finance Commission does not paint a very optimistic scenario for India’s future defence spending.

      March 03, 2010
      IDSA Comments
    • While Mahindra’s foray into defence production and the acquisition of foreign companies demonstrates the private sector’s initiative, the government needs to introduce further reforms to promote the role of private companies in Indian defence industry.

      December 22, 2009
      IDSA Comments

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