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Arctic Meltdown

The Polar Code and Arctic Navigation

November 2014

The ongoing climate-induced changes in the Arctic have resulted in prospects for exploiting resources, use of the Northern Sea Route for movement of goods, and new destinations for the cruise liner industry. These activities have the potential to impact the fragile eco-system of the Arctic as well as the livelihoods of the indigenous people.

Climate Change Narratives: Reading the Arctic

2013
Climate Change Narratives: Reading the Arctic

In an interconnected world with interlinked issues, understanding Climate Change and the Arctic and exploring the intersection between the two is extremely important. The monograph addresses Climate Change as a security risk; as a geopolitical orientation and as an energy challenge, and maps the impact of these narratives on the Arctic.

Indigenous Rights, Sovereignty and Resource Governance in the Arctic

July 2013

While oil and gas industries are already well established in Siberia and Alaska, the melting of the Arctic ice cap is opening up new areas of the High North to hydrocarbon exploration. According to the US Geological Survey (USGS), the Arctic is expected to hold about 22 per cent of the world's undiscovered, technically recoverable conventional oil and natural gas resources (about 13 per cent of undiscovered oil reserves, 30 per cent of natural gas, and 20 per cent of natural gas liquids).

Whose Arctic is it anyway?

January 01, 2008

2007 will be remembered as the year of climate change and high oil prices. Starting with the first of the four reports of the Inter-Governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the debate culminated in the award of the Nobel Peace Prize to Al Gore and the IPCC. Even the ill-fated Bali conference which failed to provide concrete direction to the future of international environmental policy reinforced the need for swift global action to curb carbon emissions.