Germany

You are here

  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Email
  • Whatsapp
  • Linkedin
  • Print
  • Prospects of US–German Relations under Trump

    In respect of trade and commerce, some uncertainties are looming over both US-German relations and US-EU relations.

    March 15, 2017

    Need to Build an Effective Indo-German Partnership

    India and Germany have complementarities that can make them effective partners. However, converting these complementarities into possibilities will depend on creating conducive environment for greater German investment and a better understanding of the German world view.

    November 09, 2015

    Fall of the Berlin Wall: Marking 25 years

    Fall of the Berlin Wall: Marking 25 years

    The fall of the wall also coincided with the collapse of the USSR and end of the Cold War. Theoverall changes since 1989 have been largely a remarkable success with the majority of citizens in the former socialist countries not wanting to go back to the earlier economic and political system.

    November 10, 2014

    The Lightning from Greece Strikes Germany

    The Lightning from Greece Strikes Germany

    If Greece defaults and walks out, the EU will be in crisis. Speculators will go for Spain and the EU will not be able to find the money to bail out a large economy such as that of Spain.

    January 30, 2015

    Global Power Shifts and Germany’s New Foreign Policy Agenda

    The German government’s 2011 abstention from the United Nations Security Council vote on military intervention in Libya raised questions about Germany’s role in the international system. By abstaining, Germany broke with its Western allies and aligned itself with four of the BRICS countries: Brazil, Russia, India and China. Its ‘non-Western’ act unleashed a debate on the future of German foreign policy. This contribution aims to provide an understanding of Germany’s new foreign policy.

    may

    Pratyush Sinha asked: Why Germany is part of the P5+1 negotiation, whereas India or Brazil is not despite substantial economic and military clout?

    S. Samuel C. Rajiv replies: The initial diplomatic efforts on the Iranian nuclear issue were spearheaded by the United Kingdom, France and Germany (E3). Some of the few instances of successful engagement were the Tehran Agreed Statement of October 2003 and the Paris Agreement of November 2004 that Iran entered into with the E3. The E3 engagement process, however, hit a roadblock in the light of Iran’s decision of August 01, 2005 to resume uranium conversion activities at Isfahan.

    The P5+1/E3+3 (made up of five permanent members of the UNSC along with Germany) took forward the process of engagement spearheaded by E3 countries after the Iranian nuclear issue was referred to the UNSC by the IAEA in February 2006. Germany’s involvement therefore began as part of the E3 as early as in 2003 and continued when the negotiation process was expanded to include the other three permanent members of the UNSC in 2006. 

    Brazil meanwhile was involved in such efforts as the May 2010 Brazil-Turkey-Iran nuclear swap deal under the terms of which (similar to the October 2009 deal involving Russia and France) Iran was to have transferred 1200 kgs of low enriched uranium (LEU) to Turkey, in return for 120 kgs of uranium fuel rods from the Vienna Group (US, Russia, France, and the IAEA) within a year of depositing the LEU. The US and France, however, rejected the deal given that Iran’s stockpile of LEU had doubled since October 2009. Such efforts also raised the stakes in the US–Turkey/Brazil bilateral ties, with these countries’ foreign policy efforts seemingly at odds with the US interests and preferences.

    For an examination of the various diplomatic-political efforts undertaken to resolve the Iranian nuclear issue, please refer to the article, “In Pursuit of a Chimera: Nuclear Imbroglio between Sanctions and Engagement,” Strategic Analysis, Routledge, 36 (6), November 2012.

    Genetics and Immigration – The public debate about Muslims in Germany

    Liberal democratic European countries are suddenly discovering their ‘national heritage’ and their ‘national culture’ because of the desire to maintain the majority position and the privileges that come with it.

    September 24, 2010

    Karun Mukherji asked: What is the truth behind Barbarossa? Was Stalin planning to invade Germany in summer of 1941?

    Kalyanaraman replies: Nazi Germany was determined to establish its primacy in Europe, which meant defeating both the Western powers and the Soviet Union in the East. The Soviet Union was committed to bringing about a world of communism, and like Russians of previous and subsequent decades, Soviet leaders were acutely conscious of the geopolitical imperative of exercising control over their periphery in Eastern Europe. In November 1940, talks between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union centred on Moscow joining the Tripartite Pact (between Germany, Italy and Japan) while at the same time Germany insisted that Soviet Russia not focus on eastern Europe and instead concentrate on territories to its south towards the Indian Ocean. But this was not acceptable to Soviet Russia. This is the backdrop against which we should look at the outbreak of conflict between these two powers. It is known that Hitler had ordered preparations for a war against the Soviet Union in the immediate aftermath of the defeat inflicted on France in the summer of 1940. And after the November 1940 talks failed to make progress, on 18 December 1940, Hitler signed a formal directive to ensure that preparations for a war against Russia be completed by 15 May 1941. For his part, Stalin surely made his own military preparations; but mainstream historians have not so far given credence to the argument that Stalin had plans to change the Soviet military's orientation from a defensive mode into an offensive mode for a invasion of Germany.

    The new government in Berlin

    On the eve of the formation of the new government it is expected that Germany would mainly devote its energy at home as the mandate is for continuity in the time of economic recession. No spectacular point-of-departure in foreign policy can hence be expected from Berlin.

    October 31, 2009

    Indo-US Strategic Partnership: Views from Germany

    The visit of US President George Bush to India in the first week of March and the signing of the Indo-US nuclear deal have evoked reactions in Western media as expected. Viewpoints expressed in the vast English media, professional websites as well as other discussion fora present a spectrum of analyses. However, it is pertinent to have a look at the vernacular German media which have been closely observing the Indo-US strategic partnership not episodically but with thorough interest.

    March 18, 2006

    Pages

    Top