Defence Diplomacy

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  • China’s growing military ties with Nepal

    China has created a constituency within the Nepal Army during the last few years. Some senior officers of the NA favour deeper military cooperation with China to reap more benefits.

    March 31, 2017

    Sri Lanka’s Fighter Selection – An Opportunity for India

    From all angles – political, economic, diplomatic and military – India is in a position to meet the SLAF’s potential combat aircraft requirements.

    March 10, 2017

    China’s Defence Minister in India: Raising Military Relations to the Next Level?

    General Liang’s visit could see the emergence of a fresh agenda in military cooperation, one which can set the course for a more meaningful and positive interaction between the two militaries in the future.

    September 04, 2012

    India Russia Military Cooperation Which Way Forward?

    This article considers the relationship—in defence terms—between India and Russia. It looks at the level of military cooperation and the nexus the two countries have created in regard to arms transfers and their joint research into, and production of, weapons systems. This relationship is, of course, one that is constantly evolving as different strategic and political pressures come to bear. The analysis here concentrates on the current standing of the defence links between Delhi and Moscow.

    The Maturing of Russia-India Defence Relations

    Defence cooperation between Russia and India remains strong because of shared security concerns, geopolitical imperatives, and economic benefits. Both countries fear radical Islamic terrorism, share concerns about regional instability in Central Asia, and are uneasy with US military hegemony and the rise of China. Powerful interest groups in both countries also have a common interest in sustaining Russian arms sales to India.

    The Sino-Indian Defence Dialogue: Addressing the Persisting Security Dilemma

    The India-China defence dialogue assumes significance in the context of the military build-up across the border and the persistence of the security dilemma between the two countries.

    December 07, 2011

    Preventive Diplomacy, Defence Cooperation & the Pursuit of Cooperative Security: The Indian Experience

    This article is an exploration of the effectiveness of defence cooperation as a means of preventive diplomacy. The paper begins by suggesting that both defence cooperation and preventive diplomacy are concepts rooted in cooperative security. For the purposes of this paper, cooperative security is understood as an overarching concept that comprises alliances, collective security and preventive action. The fundamental claim of the article is that defence cooperation has more to offer than its own immediate benefits.

    Defence Diplomacy in US-India Strategic Relationship

    Defence diplomacy helps build trust and confidence between nations and facilitates cooperation at political and economic level. This is evident from the growing US-India strategic relationship. Since the end of the Cold War, the US-India relationship has been evolving and “reaching new heights”. In this budding relationship, the most visible manifestation is cooperation in the sphere of defence.

    India’s Defence Diplomacy in Southeast Asia

    With Southeast Asia, India has been enjoying the historical legacy of the strong influence of the Indic civilization and has been strengthening its linkages through strategic engagement, economic liberalization and Free Trade Agreement with the ASEAN countries. After 1992, India formulated its defence diplomacy in consonance with the ‘Look East’ policy to safeguard its eastern seaboard and secure its strategic interests in the Indian Ocean region.

    Washington’s War & Diplomacy in Afghanistan

    The defence diplomacy of the United States in the midst of the current war against terror in Afghanistan is designed towards ending the US military operations without ceding total authority to the Taliban. The US-led international coalition of forces, that include NATO forces, have failed to crush the Taliban. On the other hand, Taliban have been unable to force the external forces to quit Afghanistan. The US does not want to quit without the assurance that no second 9/11 takes place.

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