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  • Amit Cowshish

    Distinguished Fellow
    Email: 
    amitcowshish@gmail.com
    Phone: 
    +91 11 2671 7983

    Amit Cowshish retired from the Indian Defence Accounts Service in 2012 after serving for thirty five years in various capacities in the Defence Accounts Department. He served on deputation with the Ministry of Defence first as Under Secretary and later as Additional Financial Advisor & Joint Secretary and Financial Advisor (Acquisition) & Additional Secretary. He also served as Commissioner for Departmental Inquiries on deputation with the Central Vigilance Commission.

    He has wide experience in the field of financial management in defence. While serving on deputation with the Ministry of Defence, he handled Defence Planning, budget and procurements. He was associated with drafting of the Defence Procurement Manual 2009 and its 2010 supplement. He was also associated with review of financial powers delegated to the services. He was member secretary of the Defence Expenditure Review Committee (2009).

    He attended the Advanced Professional Programme in Public Administration at the Indian Institute of Public Administration and the National Security and Strategic Course at the National Defence College, New Delhi.

    He did is M.A. and M. Phil in Political Science from Jawaharlal Nehru University and LL B from Delhi University. He holds a Post-graduate diploma in Alternative Dispute Resolution from the Indian Law Institute, New Delhi. He also holds pre-degree diplomas in Russian and Persian Languages from Jawaharlal Nehru University and a diploma in Urdu Language from National Council for Promotion of Urdu Language.

    Publications at IDSA

    Select Publications

    • Why the objective sought to be achieved through the strategic partnership scheme could not be attained by resorting to an existing provision in DPP 2016?

      June 22, 2017
      IDSA Comments
    • To achieve strategically critical self-reliance in defence production, there needs to be a greater focus on co-development, co-production projects with important partners like Israel, with an essential emphasis on exports to third countries. For the full realisation of the potential of the India–Israel defence partnership, India on its part needs to strengthen elements of its procurement processes—including the proper implementation of laid down policies.

      Strategic Analysis
    • There seems to be no clear advantage of giving an overarching role to the Ministry of Home Affairs as regards formulation of policy or grant of industrial licence for manufacture or export of defence items.

      May 29, 2017
      IDSA Comments
    • The objective of promoting Indian industry can be achieved in a simpler manner if after selecting the platform to be inducted MoD leaves it to the foreign OEM to tie up with the Indian company of its choice.

      May 22, 2017
      IDSA Comments
    • It would be both graceful and fair to pay a reasonable amount that is seen as equitable compensation for infringement of the fundamental right to life or damages arising from tortious liability of the government.

      May 17, 2017
      IDSA Comments
    • While there is no doubt that India could do with help from Japanese defence firms, the modality of acquiring technologies from foreign companies in general requires to be clearly articulated.

      May 15, 2017
      IDSA Comments
    • Speaking at the United Service Institution on May 4, 2017, the Chief of the Army Staff said that India needs to spend much more on military modernisation to ensure that economic growth continues unhindered.

      May 08, 2017
      IDSA Comments
    • The government should set up a task force to engage with potential investors and investees and evolve a simplified FDI policy, which has different slabs for different kinds of activities and is free from terms and conditions that are difficult to understand and implement.

      May 04, 2017
      IDSA Comments
    • It is important to restore the functional self-sufficiency of the finance division of a ministry which handles 17-18 per cent of the total central government expenditure so that it could discharge its responsibilities without real or perceived pressures.

      March 21, 2017
      IDSA Comments
    • The basic challenge for defence economists is to demonstrate that there are other feasible ways of skinning the cat during budget formulation. But the challenge is also inextricably linked with the need for rationalisation of defence expenditure.

      March 14, 2017
      IDSA Comments
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